This analysis examines the potential of fuel-saving technologies for new heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs) in India less than 12 tonnes over the next 10 years. This is a follow-up study to research that completed for the greater than 12-tonne segment.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Transportation's National Highway Traffic Safety Administration recently published the final Phase 2 rules targeting fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions attributable to new heavy-duty vehicles and engines.

In August 2017 the government of India published final fuel-efficiency standards for commercial heavy-duty vehicles. The standards are the government’s response to India’s rapidly growing commercial vehicle sector.

The primary objective of this literature review is to provide a glimpse at technology changes for diesel and natural gas (NG) engines in the HDV space that are expected over the next 10 to 15 years as India transitions to world-class criteria pollutant emissions standards and improved efficiency becomes a larger focus as a result of fuel efficie

India is in the process of developing fuel efficiency standards for new heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs), and one of the most critical inputs to regulatory development is a technology potential analysis to determine the efficiency levels that the fleet can reasonably achieve over the duration of the regulation.

Heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs) represent only 4% of the on-road fleet in the European Union, but are responsible for 30% of on-road CO 2 emissions. Countries around the world are implementing standards to regulate CO2 emissions from HDVs.

India is currently considering establishing fuel efficiency regulation for new trucks and buses. This process formally started in July 2014 when the Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas officially constituted a Steering Committee to guide the regulatory development process (Minstry of Petroleum & Natural Gas 2014).

On June 19, 2015, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration jointly proposed new standards to reduce the fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of new heavy-duty vehicles, tractors, trailers, and engines.

As policymakers and stakeholders in India begin the regulatory development process for fuel efficiency standards for new heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs), one of the key areas of debate has been whether or not separate performance standards for engines are an appropriate first step.

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