It is estimated that between 50%-90% of Africa’s trade in tropical timber and products is illegal which has a significant negative impact on any national economy. It is well-documented that economic activities operating outside the law impact the economy, exacerbate poverty and worsen the quality of forest management.

The Congo Basin is made up of six countries: Cameroon, the Central African Republic, the Republic of the Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Gabon and Equatorial Guinea.

Global resource use could double by 2050, representing an opportunity for tropical timber producers, according to a study published by ITTO. It forecasts that tropical industrial roundwood production will increase substantially by mid-century but says the sector needs a boost if it is to maximize its contribution to carbon-neutral production.

Populations in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) living on the fringes of forests indubitably rely on them for income and subsistence. But unsustainable practices can lead to resource degradation and depletion, threatening the very basis of their livelihoods.

To meet global restoration needs and recover degraded forests and landscapes, adequate public and private investments are required to support restoration activities on the ground.

Bamboo is one of the most important non-wood forest resources used extensively by tribals and rural poor in Tripura. While it plays an important role in the economy of the State and in subsistence activities, employment generation and household income, the economic potential is significantly greater.

The global production and trade of major wood products such as industrial roundwood, sawnwood and wood-based panels have surged to their highest level since the Food and Agriculture Organization began recording forest statistics in 1947.

FAO has released a new edition of its Yearbook of Forest Products, which compiles production and trade statistics on basic forest products including wood, wood fuel, charcoal, pulp and paper across the globe.

The Roadmap put the SDGs into action to identify risks and opportunities for the forest products sector and provides solution pathways through which the sector can minimize negative effects and strive to maximize SDG impact in the 2030 horizon.

Forests and landscapes in the Asia-Pacific region are under increasing pressure from economic development, climate change, demographic shifts, conflicts over tenure and land use, and other stressors.

Pages