This publication is the outcome of a joint project of UNCTAD and the Common Fund for Commodities (CFC) on landlocked developing countries entitled “Identifying Growth Opportunities and Supporting Measures to Facilitate Investment in Commodity Value Chains in Landlocked Countries”.

Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises (MSMEs) are key to the economies of various countries. Their numbers and contribution towards employment is well documented and there is acceptance amongst policy makers that these enterprises are critical for economic development.

Water scarcity is already widespread and remains on the rise: it is found in nearly every region in the world. Around 36% of the world’s population is currently living in water-scarce regions. This publication shows that avoiding, reducing and reversing land degradation have positive long-term gains in water security.

Over a ten-year period from July 2010 to June 2019 the authors found neither India nor Bhutan had reported any incidences of poaching or illegal trade in Red Pandas, but in Nepal a total of 13 seizure records were reported between 2016 and 2019, accounting for a total of 29 pelts. All except two took place in Kathmandu.

This report reflects the changes in the South Asia Sub-regional Economic Cooperation (SASEC) Program’s operational plan for the period 2016–2025, in particular on priority projects resulting from a rigorous vetting process.

Bhutan has long aspired to grow in a sustainable manner, prioritising both the well-being of its citizens and environmental conservation.

The Green Climate Fund’s (GCF) 23rd Board Meeting today announced more than US$84.9 million towards United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) supported adaptation and mitigation efforts in Bhutan

This brief provides policy recommendations to reduce air pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions in Bhutan’s transport sector. Increasing air pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions from vehicles has become a major concern in Bhutan, where vehicle ownership is growing by 15% per year.

Despite its small population and land area, Bhutan is among the most rapidly urbanizing countries in South Asia. While this urbanization parallels robust economic growth and the expansion of job and investment opportunities in cities, there remain challenges to fully leveraging the potential of urban areas.

As measured by various indexes and indicators, Bhutan has made steady progress in human development since democracy was introduced in 2008; implying that democracy provides an environment for people to flourish. This is according to the National Human Development Report (NHDR) titled 'Ten Years of Democracy in Bhutan’.

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