Greenpeace East Asia and the North China Electric Power University have released their first-ever renewable energy ranking of China’s tech giants. Data center operator Chindata took the top spot, with a score of 80 out of 100. Alibaba received a score of 60, edging out Tencent, GDS and Baidu, which scored 52, 48 and 46, respectively.

China’s coal-and-chemical industry has long been controversial for its high level of carbon emissions. In the recently released “13th Five-year Plan for Energy”, the coal-to-chemical industry was set a number of key construction regions. Meanwhile, global fossil fuel carbon emissions have seen a zero growth rate for three years in a row.

Analysis commissioned by Greenpeace East Asia shows that, despite having met and exceeded ambitious capacity cut targets for 2016, China’s steel industry last year saw a net increase in operating capacity equivalent to more than twice the UK’s total capacity.

After two decades of breakneck growth in coal-fired power generation, power generation from coal finally slowed down in 2011 and turned into a decline in 2013, as a result of booming clean energy and slowing power demand growth.

An updated Greenpeace East Asia report has found that in 2015 a total of 210 new coal fired power plants were granted environmental permits, in spite of the sector’s severe overcapacity problem.

This new report released by Greenpeace’s East Asia office focuses largely on coal-control policies issued by the central government in China and resulting pledges of coal limits in 12 of the country's 34 provinces, accounting for 44 percent of its coal consumption.