This report shows that improved wastewater management is as much about reducing pollution at the source, as removing contaminants from wastewater flows, reusing reclaimed water and recovering useful by-products

Energy is needed for economic growth, and access to cheap, reliable energy is an essential development objective. Historically most incremental energy demand has been met through fossil fuels, however in future that energy will have to be low-carbon and ultimately zero-carbon.

Across the world 663 million people still do not have access to water; the vast majority of them - over half a billion - live in rural areas.

Wastewater is a resource that is too valuable to throw away, especially in an increasingly water-scarce world. Wastewater from large cities is often pumped directly into rivers or seas without treatment, leading to pollution and posing a threat to the health of ecosystems and people.

The number of coal-fired power plants under development worldwide saw a dramatic drop in 2016, mainly due to shifting policies in Asia, according to a new report released by Greenpeace, the Sierra Club, and CoalSwarm.

Greening the wood energy sector holds a vast potential for reducing global greenhouse gas emissions and improving rural livelihoods, FAO said on the occasion of the UN's International Day of Forests. Up to seven percent of global greenhouse gas emissions caused by humans come from the production and use of fuelwood and charcoal.

This annual statement confirms that 2016 was the warmest year on record, approximately 1.1 °C above the pre-industrial period, and 0.06 °C above the previous highest value set in 2015. Noteworthy extreme events in 2016 included severe droughts that brought food insecurity to millions in southern and eastern Africa and Central America.

This report analyzes four paths that countries could take over the next three decades, ranging from business as usual to a scenario where countries adopt both ambitious climate policies and improve resource efficiency. It finds that smarter use of resources can add $2 trillion annually to the global economy.

Limiting the rise in global mean temperature to well below 2°C would require an energy transition of exceptional scope, depth and speed, according to an analysis by the International Energy Agency, including a doubling of annual average energy-related investments from current levels.

Wind and solar PV have become among the cheapest options for meeting power demand in a growing number of countries globally. As these variable renewable energy (VRE) technologies differ from conventional generation technologies, power systems will need to adapt in line with their ongoing build-out.

Pages