World efforts to lower hunger to zero by 2030 are being negated by warfare and climate change, warn nutritionists.

Cheap, reliable and hard to hijack, the sun could be an ideal energy source in many war zones and disaster areas, prompting aid agencies to consider ditching costly fuel for solar power.

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) announced today the launch of its flagship multi-sectoral nutrition project, USAID Advancing Nutrition.

Development aid is failing to improve the lives of the poorest 20 percent of the world's population, according to a report predicted growing global inequality.

The 2018 Global Hunger Index (GHI) shows that the world has made gradual, long-term progress in reducing overall hunger, but this progress has been uneven. Areas of severe hunger and undernutrition stubbornly persist, reflecting human misery for millions.

This working paper outlines key features of the global climate finance landscape. It notes that the diverse sources of climate funds, the multitude of priorities, and varied channels for implementation create the potential for overlapping actions and coordination challenges. These challenges exist at both the global and national levels.

In 2015, the leaders of 193 governments promised to reduce inequality under Goal 10 of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Without reducing inequality, meeting SDG 1 to eliminate poverty will be impossible.

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) represent an exponential advance from the Millennium Development Goals, with a substantially broader agenda affecting all nations and requiring coordinated global actions.

Renewable energy has grown rapidly in recent years, especially in the electricity sector where renewables now account for the largest power capacity additions globally. However, renewables still account for only just above 10% of final energy consumption and the energy sector remains dominated by fossil fuels.

Limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees would require rapid, far reaching and unprecedented changes in all aspects of society, the IPCC said in this new assessment. It compares the impact of global warming of 1.5 deg C and 2 deg C. It states that the world stands on the brink of failure when it comes to holding climate change to moderate levels and that there is only a decade to try and cut emissions.

Pages