The unprecedented socio-economic crisis resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic calls for unparalleled multi-sectoral responses.

Renewable power sources have so far showed impressive resilience despite the disruptions and changes caused by the coronavirus pandemic, with their share of the electricity mix increasing in many markets.

The twin shocks of school closures and global recession due to COVID-19 could have long-term costs to education and development. But, if countries move quickly to support continued learning, they can at least partially mitigate the damage.

The impacts of this rapidly evolving health pandemic are now being felt in every corner of the world. UNOPS is working closely with the UN family, governments and other partners to support mitigation and response efforts. COVID-19 poses serious challenges to the capacity of health systems around the world. Medical personnel are under pressure.

Economic distress and social discontent will rise over the next 18 months unless world leaders, businesses and policy-makers work together to manage the fallout of the pandemic. As economies restart, there is an opportunity to embed greater societal equality and sustainability into the recovery, which would unleash a new era of prosperity.

The international statistics community has continued to work together, in partnership with national statistical offices and systems around the world, to ensure that the best quality data and statistics are available to support decision making during and after the current crisis.

At the beginning of April, the 2020 edition of the Global Report on Food Crises was issued, presenting a stark warning for the future. In 2019 – prior to the COVID-19 pandemic – 135 million people experienced “crisis” and worse levels of acute food insecurity. A further 183 million were on the edge in “stressed” food security conditions.

As the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development enters its fifth year of implementation, it is opportune to ask how governance is understood and implemented around the world. In fact, one can go further to probe the extent to which governments are cognizant of the principles undergirding effective governance.

Aiming to strengthen the global response to the threat of climate change, Parties adopted the Paris Agreement in 2015, and through it established an enhanced transparency framework (ETF). Countries are now actively engaged in establishing the necessary arrangements to implement the ETF.

Careful implementation of carbon pricing with reductions in fossil fuel subsidies can raise revenues to support the COVID-19 recovery and make society less vulnerable to future climate, ecological or public health risks, according to a new policy brief published today (May 15th) by the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and Environmen

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