The UN Human Settlements Programme (UN-Habitat) and the National Academy of Economic Strategy (NAES) of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS) have jointly released a report on cities’ competitiveness around the world, focusing on the relationship between housing and urban competitiveness.

Fossil fuel subsidies undercut the international community’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and climate change objectives in many ways.

This paper explores the benefits of a coordinated approach to land and water governance in efforts to address the global food security challenge and the need to tackle gender inequality in access to and control over land and water. The scarcity of arable land and freshwater is at the centre of debates about the global food security challenge.

The World Energy Council’s definition of energy sustainability is based on three core dimensions: energy security, energy equity, and environmental sustainability. Balancing these three goals constitutes a ‘trilemma’ and is the basis for prosperity and competitiveness of individual countries.

The World Energy Trilemma 2017 report Changing dynamics – Using distributed energy resources to meet the Trilemma challenge, prepared in partnership with global consultancy Oliver Wyman, along with the Global Risk Centre of its parent Marsh & McLennan Companies, tapped into the global insights of the traditional and emerging players in the

The International Solar Alliance (ISA) presents its first offering, a Common Risk Mitigation Mechanism (CRMM) feasibility study, at COP23 in Bonn, Germany, to deepen solar markets, which aims to mobilize up to $1trn of capital investment by 2030.

Much has changed since countries first developed their NDCs. All Parties have the opportunity to communicate new or updated NDCs by 2020, informed by the outcomes of a facilitative dialogue in 2018, and incorporating advances in renewable energy, technology and policy developments in key sectors.

Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) are a cornerstone of the Paris Agreement on climate change. They set out the actions that countries plan to undertake to achieve the agreement’s objectives, focused on limiting the rise in average global temperatures to well below 2°C, ideally to 1.5 °C.

This paper assesses each of the world’s countries in terms of whether their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have peaked, when they have peaked, and whether they have a commitment that implies an emissions peak in the future.

Developing countries can meet climate targets promised in the landmark Paris Agreement by catalyzing trillions of dollars in private investments through a combination of smart policy reforms and innovative business models, according to Creating Markets for Climate Business, a new report by IFC.

Pages