ISRO has monitored the advance and retreat of 2,018 glaciers across the Himalayan region using satellite data from 2000-01 to 2010-11.

Paris - Natural changes in the environment are responsible for about 40% of Arctic sea ice loss, while humans are to blame for the rest, says a climate study.

Meteorological studies have indicated that high alpine environments are strongly affected by climate warming, and periglacial debris flows are frequent in deglaciated regions. The combination of rainfall and air temperature controls the initiation of periglacial debris flows, and the addition of meltwater due to higher air temperatures enhances the complexity of the triggering mechanism compared to that of storm-induced debris flows.

Researchers say global warming could melt mountain snow more slowly, a peculiar finding that might be bad news for the American West.

Gangotri glacier’s rate of receding slows, but base thinning: Experts Development (GBPNIHESD) who conducted a study of the glacier located in Uttarkashi from 2008 till 2016.

UDAIPUR: "Mother Earth is pregnant with problems and only the tribal way of life can save it from decay.

The West Antarctic Ice Sheet is one of the largest potential sources of rising sea levels. Over the past 40 years, glaciers flowing into the Amundsen Sea sector of the ice sheet have thinned at an accelerating rate, and several numerical models suggest that unstable and irreversible retreat of the grounding line—which marks the boundary between grounded ice and floating ice shelf—is underway.

Mass loss from the West Antarctic ice shelves and glaciers has been linked to basal melt by ocean heat flux. The Totten Ice Shelf in East Antarctica, which buttresses a marine-based ice sheet with a volume equivalent to at least 3.5 m of global sea-level rise, also experiences rapid basal melt, but the role of ocean forcing was not known because of a lack of observations near the ice shelf. Observations from the Totten calving front confirm that (0.22 ± 0.07) × 106 m3 s−1 of warm water enters the cavity through a newly discovered deep channel.

Unless the world stops burning fossil fuels that are fuelling global warming, irreversible changes in the Arctic could have disastrous effects for the people that live there and for the rest of the

A scientist has engineered a way to possibly solve the problems of glacial melting in the Himalayas through artificial glacier towers called an ice stupa.

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