igshare's annual report, The State of Open Data 2017, looks at global attitudes towards open data. It includes survey results of 2,300 respondents and a collection of articles from industry experts, as well as a foreword from Jean-Claude Burgelman, Head of Unit Open Data Policies and Science Cloud at the European Commission.

While we really have no shortage of women learning science and excelling therein as well as in teaching science, their involvement in ‘doing’ science, in leading and directing scientific investigations is not commensurate with those who train in science. While the small fraction of women in the scientific work force is a reality the world over, the situation in India differs from the West in some respects. In India, the matter of real concern is the precipitous loss in ‘trained scientific women power’ at the postdoctoral level. (Editorial)

The Global Wildlife Program has released the first-ever review of international donor funding for combatting illegal wildlife trade in Africa and Asia, which shows that over $1.3 billion was committed by 24 international donors since 2010, or approximately $190 million per year.

The Global Wildlife Program has released the first-ever review of international donor funding for combatting illegal wildlife trade in Africa and Asia, which shows that over $1.3 billion was committed by 24 international donors since 2010, or approximately $190 million per year.

Scientists — just like everybody else — have little idea what will happen now that the United Kingdom has voted to exit the European Union. (Editorial)

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Ten Indian research leaders give their prescriptions, from better funding, facilities, mentoring and education to greater respect, fairness, autonomy and confidence.

K. Vijay Raghavan is determined to cut through red tape and build up biological science in India.

 

Despite great strides in some areas of research and development, the nation still has a long way to go.

Original Source

Indian science is a study in contrasts. With its vast population and rapidly expanding economy, the country has ramped up scientific production at an impressive rate. India started the twenty-first century well behind Russia, France, Italy and Canada in terms of yearly publications and it now leads them all by healthy margins. It is quickly closing in on Japan. Despite those gains, India is not yet a major player in world science. Its publications generate fewer citations on average than do those of other science-focused nations, including other emerging countries such as Brazil and China.

India is making great strides in improving its science, but it needs to look carefully at its approach and work with the rest of the world if it is to realize its full potential. (Editorial)

Original Source

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