NewClimate Institute, PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency and IIASA present an overview of on climate change mitigation policies in 25 major emitting countries/regions that have been adopted since July 2017.

Estimates of the EU's greenhouse gas emission budgets for the rest of the century vary considerably but have one thing in common: The EU's emission budget is very small and shrinking rapidly.

CO2 emissions and total global greenhouse gas emissions are reported for 2016, based on the latest update of the EDGAR v4.3.2 database, using statistics, where available, up to and including 2016.

This report provides an overview of projected greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in 25 emitting countries/regions (Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Ethiopia, the European Union, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kazakhstan, Mexico, Morocco, the Philippines, Republic of Korea, the Russian Fe

Global emissions of climate-warming carbon dioxide remained static in 2016, a welcome sign that the world is making at least some progress in the battle against global warming by halting the long-term rising trend.

While carbon dioxide emissions from energy use must be the primary target of climate change mitigation efforts, land use and land cover change (LULCC) also represent an important source of climate forcing.

Current commitments under the Paris Agreement are not sufficient to limit global warming to well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels; the UNEP Emissions Gap Report 2015 showed that a mitigation gap of 14 GtCO2e exists for 2030. Against this background international climate initiatives can play an important role for reducing global emissions.

A new report released by the NGOs Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) and Forest Trends (FT) consists of case studies on how companies are working with the governments of Brazil and Indonesia, which together accounted for nearly 40 percent of total tropical deforestation in 2014, to achieve their shared goals around forests and the climate.

This working paper presents a study on the combined effect of land-use land-cover (LULC) changes and the effects of climate variability for a specific study area in Kenya. The study was run between the years 1995 and 2010. LULC changes revealed competing land uses, which increased base and rock cover.

This paper is an accompaniment to the FAO study, 'The Agricultural Sectors in the Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs): Analysis'.

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