This report shows how 2020 marked ten years of cities reporting the climate and environmental data through the CDP-ICLEI Unified Reporting System. It presents how in 2020, there has been a 17x increase in city disclosure since 2011 — 812 cities have disclosed, compared to just 48 in 2011.

This practice note looks at the WRI India approach of developing a powerful value accelerator platform to scale innovative solutions for gaps in service delivery in collaboration with the quadruple helix stakeholders of government, private sector, academia and citizens.

A necessary extension of the concept of Resource Recovery and Reuse with an even higher priority is the prevention and reduction of waste. One concern, in particular, is food waste, which constitutes the largest share of human waste.

Buildings are the most prominent feature of most cities, occupying large areas to provide homes and services for residents. Buildings are also among the biggest users of energy and contribute substantially to greenhouse gas emissions.

The energy transition in cities promises to transform the urban environment, with impacts that extend well beyond the energy sector. It will shape transport, buildings, land use and a host of other sectors.

Cities are critical to the global energy transition. The most visible energy transitions today occur in major cities. With their comparatively large revenue bases, big cities have the regulatory frameworks and infrastructure to scale up renewables and meet emission reduction targets.

This book is a collaborative effort born under the COVID-19 pandemic and the need to address the uncertain future of cities.

This brief gives an overview of different country case studies where social protection (SP) systems have been used to address risks arising from climate-related hazards in urban spaces. It also explores how the existing SP systems in Tanzania, Bangladesh and Ethiopia could be modified, given adequate resources, to become shock responsive.

UN-Habitat’s new report - Cities and Pandemics: Towards a more just, green and healthy future – demonstrates how cities can reduce the impact of future pandemics and become more equitable, healthy and environmentally friendly.

Bangladesh is often referred to as the “ground zero for climate change”. The topography and location of the country make it highly prone to extreme weather events, including cyclones, floods, salinity intrusion and storm surges.

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