Green roofs offer a series of benefits to buildings and to the urban environment. Their use in dry climates requires optimizing the choice of their components (i.e., vegetation, substrate and drainage layer) for the specific local climatic conditions, in order to minimize irrigations needs while preserving the attributes of the roof. In this study, we calibrated and validated an existing hydrological model—IHMORS—for the simulation of the hydrological performance of green roofs.

Highly variable water regimes, such as California’s, contain distinctive problems in the pursuit of secure timing, quantities and distributions of highly variable flows. Their formal and informal systems of water control must adapt rapidly to forceful and unpredictable swings on which the survival of diversified ecosystems, expansive settlement patterns and market-driven economies depends. What constitutes resilient water governance in these high-variability regimes?

Normally groundwater recharge is estimated using methods based on water balance, water table fluctuations, fixed factor of annual rainfall and tracer movement. In many of these methods water stored in the vadose zone and evapotranspiration are not accounted properly. These factors control groundwater recharge to a large extent, particularly in arid and semi-arid regions which are normally characterized by a deep water table, thick vadose zone and high evapotranspiration.

There is growing evidence that climate change will alter water availability in Europe. Here, we investigate how hydrological low flows are affected under different levels of future global warming (i.e. 1.5, 2, and 3 K with respect to the pre-industrial period) in rivers with a contributing area of more than 1000 km2. 

Original Source

Bed sediment samples were collected along the 9.5 km long inlet channel of Chilika lagoon, east coast of India during low freshwater discharge and low rainfall condition. Distributions of bed sediment along with its texture were studied in detail. Bivariate plots between mean, sorting, skewness and kurtosis of sediments revealed definite grouping pattern. The study, through C-M plot, indicates that the prime factors for transportation of sediment within inlet channel of Chilika lagoon are rolling and bottom suspension during period of low discharge and low rainfall (November-June).

Order of the National Green Tribunal in the matter of Akash Vashishtha Vs Ministry of Environment and Forests & Climate Change & Others dated 31/01/2018 regarding concretization in River Yamuna in Vrindavan, Uttar Pradesh. The main application has been filed for declaring the activity of construction work of River Front Development and laying of pipeline in river bed and flood plain of River Yamuna as illegal and for restoring of the river bed and flood plain of River Yamuna.

Worldwide glacier retreat and associated future runoff changes raise major concerns over the sustainability of global water resources, but global-scale assessments of glacier decline and the resulting hydrological consequences are scarce. Here we compute global glacier runoff changes for 56 large-scale glacierized drainage basins to 2100 and analyse the glacial impact on streamflow.

We increasingly rely on global models to project impacts of humans and climate on water resources. How reliable are these models? While past model intercomparison projects focused on water fluxes, we provide here the first comprehensive comparison of land total water storage trends from seven global models to trends from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites, which have been likened to giant weighing scales in the sky.

Order of the National Green Tribunal (Central Zonal Bench, Bhopal) in the matter of Babulal Jajoo Vs. State of Rajasthan & Others dated 10/01/2018 regarding Chambal river conservation. Counsel for the State of Rajasthan submits that the work at Sajidera has already been completed and at Ram Dham it is 80% completed and he would be filing the time bound Action Plan for construction of STP.

Future changes in rainfall have serious impacts on human adaptation to climate change, but quantification of these changes is subject to large uncertainties in climate model projections. To narrow these uncertainties, significant efforts have been made to understand the intermodel differences in future rainfall changes. Here, we show a strong inverse relationship between present-day precipitation and its future change to possibly calibrate future precipitation change by removing the present-day bias in climate models.