Some 1.8–4.1 billion people living in the developing countries of South Asia, South-East Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America are vulnerable to heat-related stress, and lack access to technol

Extremely high fire danger conditions are expected over the north-eastern parts of the Northern Cape, the northern parts of Free State and the North West.

Temperatures nudging 50 degrees, bushfires ravaging rainforests and people at increased risk of cardiac arrests because of heatwaves — this is the new normal for Australia and it’s being driven by climate change.

This report from the USAID-funded Adaptation Thought Leadership and Assessments (ATLAS) project examines efforts to better understand and manage the risks of extreme heat on human wellbeing, including the public health burden heat poses and the direct and indirect impacts of heat waves.

British-grown potatoes, vegetables and fruit are at risk as growers struggle to cope with extreme and unpredictable weather, made more likely by climate change. Apple growers lost around 25% of their harvest in 2017 due to unexpectedly late frosts.

The engagement of young people is vital for addressing current and future environmental challenges. This is particularly true in Asia and the Pacific, where ever-escalating development is bringing about a growing raft of environmental and societal challenges.

Australia is having an unusually hot summer as the heatwave continues to break records. This is true for night-time lows as well as daytime highs.

Australia had its warmest ever December on record and temperatures this week nudged 50C in some places

Australians have been warned to avoid exerting themselves outdoors and to drink lots of water as record temperatures in parts of the country look set to linger, and even increase, over coming days.

A huge swathe of Australia baked in mid-40 degree heat on Friday, with more records likely to be broken at the tail-end of a heatwave that set a slew of national highs last month.

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