World Energy Balances 2017 offers final and complete energy balances for 1971 to 2015, with supply estimates for 2016, by country and region. This overview from World Energy Balances 2017 contains a summary of the most recent energy trends.

Energy-related emissions represent two-thirds of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Immediate action is needed to start putting the world on a path to net-zero emissions, as per the Paris Agreement. Renewable energy and energy efficiency will work in synergy to drive global energy decarbonisation.

Coal would remain at the centre stage in India with its share in energy mix not declining below 46% in 2047, claimed a report titled ‘Energising India’, jointly prepared by the NITI Aayog and the Institute of Energy Economics, Japan. The study found that coal and nuclear would continue to operate as base load units for power generation.

Technological breakthroughs are needed to reduce carbon emissions in the energy sector.

This policy brief suggests that carbon pricing can accelerate the diffusion of lowcarbon technology in China, based on the results of empirical studies conducted by Kansai Research Centre of IGES focusing on China’s most energy intensive industries. Many low-carbon technologies are profitable but require some initial investment.

Each year, the IEA’s Tracking Clean Energy Progress (TCEP) report examines developments across a range of clean energy sectors and technologies. The TCEP uses benchmarks for 2025 as modelled in Energy Technology Perspectives 2017, as well as the milestones identified in the IEA Technology Roadmaps.

Energy consumption in Africa is the lowest in the world, and per capita consumption has barely changed since 2000 shows a new Atlas released by the UN Environment and African Development Bank at the World Economic Forum being held in Durban, South Africa. Current energy production in Africa is insufficient to meet demand.

In November 2015, the leaders of Asia-Pacific Economic Co-operation (APEC) economies, reaffirmed their landmark 2009 commitment to “rationalize and phase out over the medium term inefficient fossil fuel subsidies that encourage wasteful consumption while recognizing the importance of providing those in need with essential energy services”.

This paper aims to investigate the effects of urbanization, renewable and non-renewable energy consumption, trade liberalization, and economic growth on pollutant emissions and energy intensity in selected Asian developing countries from 1980 to 2010.

This new REN21 Renewables Global Futures Report presents views of 114 renowned energy experts from around the world, on the feasibility and challenges of achieving a 100% renewable energy future.

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