Adopted in 2015, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) were intended to motivate governments and the international community to address the world’s most pressing social and environmental challenges. However, most countries are not on pace to achieve the SDGs.

This article investigates and empirically tests the link between climate change and sovereign risk in Southeast Asia. Southeast Asian countries are among those most heavily affected by climate change. The number and intensity of extreme weather events in the region have been increasing markedly, causing severe social and economic damage.

Effective solid waste management is critical for achieving sustainable development in municipalities. In the last half century, urban cities around the world have grown significantly, and experts forecast that this trend will continue into the future.

India has committed itself to rapid and large-scale renewable energy (RE) capacity addition. As part of its nationally determined contributions (NDCs) under the Paris Agreement, India intends to achieve a 40% share of installed power generation capacity from non-fossil fuel sources by 2030 (UNFCCC NDC Registry 2017).

This book provides a comprehensive analysis of the environment and climate change in Asia. It first gives an overview of the environmental challenges facing the region and summarizes the economic impacts of climate change. It also offers in-depth discussions of environmental regulations, environmental governance, environmental evaluation, and the growth of carbon markets in Asia. The volume finally explores the relationship between globalization and the environment, particularly through informative case studies on the People’s Republic of China and India.

This paper is designed to provide comprehensive details on the carbon markets across the major Asian economies and with specific attention to the Chinese carbon market. Particularly discuss the carbon markets across the major northeast (the People’s Republic of China [PRC], Japan, and the Republic of Korea) Asian economies.

Policy makers should focus on improving access to safely managed wastewater management services. Even though access to improved sanitation facilities has improved, progress in access to safely managed sanitation services is still slow. Globally, 4.5 billion people still lack access to safely managed sanitation.

Placing Asian economies onto a sustainable development pathway requires an unprecedented shift in investment away from greenhouse gas, fossil fuel, and natural resource-intensive industries toward more resource-efficient technologies and business models. The financial sector will have to play a central role in this green transformation.

Develop the concept of aggregate emission targets, which are goals for national emissions but do not dictate the forms of regulation used to achieve the goals. Compare aggregate emission intensity, quantity, and price targets adopted at the national level but implemented cost effectively at the

The recently agreed Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are expected to guide development through the 2030 time horizon. The 17 SDGs cover many areas, such as poverty, health, sustainable development, and the environment.

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