Billions of people in Asia and the Pacific depend on healthy oceans for their livelihoods, food security, health, and recreation.

Unsustainable consumption, driven by the increasing extraction of raw materials, manufacturing, and production, is contributing to environmental degradation and the acceleration of climate change. In developing Asia, consumption trends will continue to rise as populations and economies grow.

In order to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), Asian countries are trying to realize the potential of energy innovation. However, several structural issues might deter the expected impact of energy innovation on GHG emissions.

Urban India, particularly metros, is a major hotspot of air pollution with a PM2.5 concentration level ranging above the permissible limits defined by the WHO for most of the year. Unsurprisingly, special efforts have been made by the Government of India in recent years to improve air quality.

Providing public utilities services to slum areas has always been a significant public policy challenge in developing countries. Providing public utilities services to slum areas has always been a significant public policy challenge in developing countries.

COVID-19 economic recovery can be advanced by greater efforts to boost longer-term resilience and sustainability in Asia and the Pacific.

In Asia, where rapid urbanization is occurring, inadequate water and sanitation services are a problem due to insufficient investment. Asia’s urbanization rate has risen from 32.8% in 1991 to 51.1% in 2020, and more than half of the world’s urban population already lives in Asia.

The gender of the household head, economic status, land ownership, and education significantly influence food security for rural households in Nepal. Gender studies on food security have often focused on the differences between male-headed households (MHHs) and female-headed households (FHHs).

The world has made great strides in improving sanitation conditions in recent decades.

Analysis of sanitation, health, and education using country-level data suggests that sanitation improves child health, increases enrollment, and leads to higher girls’ participation in schools.

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