Ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA) — a subset of nature-based approaches to help people adapt to climate change — is an increasingly popular strategy. Evidence from 13 initiatives in 12 countries shows that EbA can provide important, wide-reaching and long-term benefits relating to adaptation, the environment and social issues.

How can agricultural production increase to meet the rapidly growing food demand in sub-Saharan Africa without reducing its precious forest areas? This is one of the greatest challenges in achieving sustainable land use and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in the region.

Despite the Zambian Government’s intention to diversify agriculture, the country is still heavily reliant on a narrow range of crops. Two-thirds of the total area under crop cultivation is devoted to maize. Consequently, the Zambian food system is not delivering enough affordable or nutritious foods for the majority of the population.

Illegal wildlife trade (IWT) is devastating populations of iconic wildlife species such as rhinos and elephants, as well as lesser known ones such as pangolins, sturgeon and rosewood. As well as being a growing threat to conservation, IWT also has significant socioeconomic impacts.

Growing commercial interests, population growth and conservation initiatives are increasing competition for land in Tanzania. At the same time, land-related conflicts are on the rise. These trends undermine livelihoods by threatening rural people’s access to land and tenure security.

This research is part of a process of evidence generation to help protect and improve the food systems of the urban poor in the city of Bandung, in a period of rapid urbanisation and modernisation. It focuses on the role of street food vendors and informal food providers, who have a contested place in the city’s growth.

As countries increasingly commit to sustainable development pathways, they need approaches that assess the sustainability dimension of national policies and interventions, including their contribution to multiple sustainable development aims.

The Kenya County Climate Change Fund (CCCF) mechanism, initially piloted as the Climate Adaptation Fund in Isiolo and subsequently scaled out to Garissa, Kitui, Makueni and Wajir Counties, is a pioneering mechanism to facilitate the flow of climate finance to county governments and simultaneously empower local communities, through strengthening

The global climate is changing rapidly and countries need clear direction on how best to adapt to these changes. Ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA) is becoming an increasingly popular strategy, especially in poor countries where dependence on natural resources for lives and livelihoods is high.

The Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme (MGNREGS) is already delivering climate resilience to India’s rural poor. This report examines how MGNREGS can use climate finance to deliver improved resilience and maximise its development outcomes to reach the rural poor at scale, enabling better spend of India’s climate finance.

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