Even before COVID-19, fears were growing over developing country debt, which had surpassed US$8 trillion by the end of 2019. The pandemic has made the situation much worse as its economic impact pushes millions more women, children and men in these countries into poverty.

Climate change is both a negative outcome of environmentally damaging food systems, and a threat to the future of food production and the livelihoods that depend on it. The Sustainable Diets for All (SD4All) programme has been informed by the linkages between food systems and climate change, as well as health.

Sustainable Diets for All (SD4All) is an advocacy programme, coordinated by IIED and Hivos, which is designed to improve access to healthy and sustainable diets for low-income communities, while highlighting the important link between food and climate.

The plight of indigenous peoples has drawn increased attention in recent years as they strive to retain their cultures and protect their ecosystems, lands and food traditions in the face of globalisation.

In Mozambique, fisheries are important to the national economy and individual livelihoods. Shallow water shrimp fisheries (SWSF) provide an important source of income for many coastal communities.

The Asia and Pacific region is home to more than half the world’s undernourished children, but also has the fastest growing prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity. With micronutrient deficiencies added to undernutrition and overweight/obesity, the result is known as the ‘triple burden of malnutrition’.

Agricultural expansion is the greatest driver of the loss of nature and its biodiversity and ecosystem services worldwide. In Africa, this is primarily the expansion of food crops to meet growth in domestic food demand. Further losses are inevitable before the situation stabilises.

Climate funds should facilitate the transition to a low-carbon and climate-resilient future. Energy storage and ancillary grid services are critical to expanding the proportion of intermittent renewable generation on the electricity grid.

Climate funds should facilitate the transition to a low-carbon and climate-resilient future. Energy storage and ancillary grid services are critical to expanding the proportion of intermittent renewable generation on the electricity grid.

Boosting agricultural production to meet the food demands of growing and more prosperous populations increasingly comes with a cost to the ecosystems upon which human life more broadly depends. Yet many developing countries (and some developed countries) do not acknowledge or understand these trade-offs.

Pages