Loss and damage is an urgent concern, driven by the increasingly harmful effects of climate change. Communities are experiencing new types and forms of climate impact, of higher frequency and intensity, which they are not equipped to handle.

Locally led adaptation (LLA) is an approach which seeks to ensure that local people have individual and collective agency over defining, prioritising, designing, implementing, monitoring and evaluating adaptation actions.

People in Burigoalini and Gabura Unions frequently face climate-related hazards. Adequate adaptation measures to these hazards are often missing, causing losses and damages. This paper focuses on non-economic losses and damages: items that are not commonly traded in markets (such as the loss of biodiversity or cultural heritage).

By 2050, water stress, sea-level rise and crop failure from climate change may displace 31–72 million people across sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia and Latin America. Distress migration generates grave socioeconomic consequences — both for migrants and the families they leave behind.

Effective climate budgeting requires meaningful participation and systematic public engagement.

Water access is the cornerstone of livelihoods for most rural communities in Tanzania. Yet limited capacity for effective planning, management and governance of water sources is deepening vulnerability to the increasing and often unpredictable impacts of climate change.

There are several aspects of climate-induced short-term or circular migration, especially in combination with other socio-economic factors, that are not fully understood. Without reliable data on the pattern of circular migration, policymakers can not recognise or address migrants’ needs, issues and vulnerabilities.

Africa is severely impacted by the triple crisis of debt, climate change and nature loss. The continent’s debt now stands at more than 70% of GDP. There is potential to address these crises through ‘general purpose’ debt financing linked to climate and nature key performance indicators (KPIs).

This report discusses how climate change and climate-induced migration heightens existing vulnerabilities of slavery. Drivers of vulnerability to modern slavery are complex and impacted by many layers of risk.

In Uganda, many people illegally hunt, traffic or trade wildlife because other opportunities to earn money are limited. But poaching is also driven by anger and resentment towards increasing conflict between humans and wildlife, and the feeling among communities that parks don’t take their concerns seriously or do enough to support them.

Pages