One of the greatest challenges for climate change adaptation is how to build resilience for the billion urban dwellers who are estimated to live in what are termed informal settlements .

By 2050, the world is expected to generate 3.40 billion tonnes of waste annually, increasing drastically from today’s 2.01 billion tonnes. What a Waste presents national and urban waste management data from around the world and highlights the need for urgent action.

This book covers a holistic overview of the Indian plastic industry, existing challenges, the role of citizen groups and, most importantly, the role of the informal sector. The Indian lifestyle is based on a maximal recovery of resources before disposal.

This report presents the economic, trade, and gender profiles of partner states of the East African Community (EAC) within the context of regional integration, and analyses the impact of EAC regional integration on women’s well-being with a focus on women’s employment. Both descriptive and quantitative analyses are used to this end.

Economic growth performance in the Asia-Pacific region continues to improve on the back of firmer global demand and stable inflation. The tasks at hand are to ensure that such economic performance is sustained over time, that it benefits everyone and that any adverse environmental implications are minimal.

A small but growing number of cities are adopting more inclusive approaches to informal workers and this offers important lessons for cities that seek a more equal, productive and environmentally sustainable future.

Two billion workers — representing 61.2 per cent of the world’s employed population — are in informal employment. The third edition of this work provides, for the first time, comparable estimates on the size of the informal economy and a statistical profile of informality in all its diversity at the global and regional levels.

Incorporating the most recent employment trends for young women and men, Global Employment Trends for Youth sets out the youth labour market situation around the world.

Recycling has been taking place in South Africa for more than three decades, driven by social and economic needs. While the waste hierarchy is embedded in national policy, an extensive legislative framework has made it more and more challenging for the public and private sector to remain compliant and competitive in a local and global market, and still drive waste away from landfill towards reuse, recycling and recovery. A local recycling economy, on par with many developed countries, is in part due to a large and active informal waste sector.

They are young and restless to make real improvements in poverty eradication and environmental sustainability. These locally led green start-ups across Africa are not just promising but also innovative in their approach.

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