During 2014-2017 India was shaken by severe spells of drought that hit over 500 million people across geographical regions. Unlike in the past, these droughts did not spare the urban areas; metropolitan cities like Chennai, Hyderabad and Bengaluru declared water emergency and several towns resorted to water rationing. “Drought But Why?” examines how an occupational hazard has turned into a human-made disaster of unmanageable proportion since organised agriculture began some 10,000 years ago.

The Union government in the Rajya Sabha stated that the detailed project report (DPR) of the Par-Tapi-Narmada and Damanganga-Pinjal link projects have been completed and have been submitted to the

Patna: There is a probability of increase in the frequency and intensity of climate-related natural hazards due to climate change in the country, and Bihar is no exception to this.

This handbook covers some of the most commonly used drought indicators/indices that are being applied across drought-prone regions, with the goal of advancing monitoring, early warning and information delivery systems in support of risk-based drought management policies and preparedness plans.

Drought is one of the main causes of food insecurity. In 2011, the horn of Africa has faced the worst drought in 60 years. An estimated 12.4 million people suffered from a massive food shortage.

Raipur: India's drought-prone area has increased by 57 per cent since 1997.

The idea to get farmers suffering from depression to get counselling was sparked by a massive survey launched by the state government in October last year.

While the finance minister took care to express the commitment of his government to poor and vulnerable people while presenting the Union Budget for 2016–17, this stated commitment has not been backed by adequate increases in allocations to areas of critical interest to the poor. It is likely that resource constraints will continue to be a serious hindrance in important areas like nutrition, health and livelihood support. (Letter)

The study highlights the climatic water balance, drought assessment and agricultural potentiality of Uppar Odai sub-basin located in the Southern part of India, Tamil Nadu state. The average annual precipitation in the sub-basin is 625 mm, which is much lower than the state average rainfall (970 mm). It has been observed that the intensive agricultural practices and extensive groundwater mining lead to the groundwater decline in the sub-basin. Rainfall data were collected from 1971-2011 for five rain gauge stations.

The Technology Demonstration Component of NICRA, implemented by 121 Krishi Vigyan Kendras (KVKs), addresses climate vulnerabilities in identified 50 drought-prone target districts spread across 17 States.

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