Forests in at least 10 World Heritage sites have become net sources of carbon, due to pressure from human activity and climate change, according to a new report by the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

The book’s primary intention is to serve as a roadmap for professionals working in developing countries interested in the Nexus Water-Energy-Food-Ecosystems (WEFE) approach.

The theme for this third publication of the UNESCO i-WSSM Global Water Security Issues is the role of sound groundwater resources management and governance to achieve water security. As an underground resource, often called the invisible resource, groundwater is more difficult to quantify, assess and monitor than surface water resources.

Although spending on science has risen worldwide, greater investment is needed in the face of growing crises, the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) has recommended in a new report published.

The Accomplishment Report provides an overview of the main achievements of the project “Addressing Water Security: Climate Impacts and Adaptation Responses in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean”, implemented from 2014 to 2020 by UNESCO’s Intergovernmental Hydrological Programme (IHP) with the support from the Flanders Fund-in-Trust (F

Climate change and loss of biodiversity is seen as the most pressing challenge over the decade, according to the World in 2030 Survey report published by the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

The report highlights the crucial role of engineering in achieving each of the 17 SDGs. It shows how equal opportunities for all is key to ensuring an inclusive and gender balanced profession that can better respond to the shortage of engineers for implementing the SDGs.

UNESCO shows 40% of poorest countries failed to support learners at risk during COVID-19 crisis and urges inclusion in education. Fewer than 10% of countries have laws that help ensure full inclusion in education, according to UNESCO’s 2020 Global Education Monitoring Report: Inclusion and education – All means all.

Conjunctive Water Management is an approach to water resources manage­ment in which surface water, groundwater and other components of the water cycle are considered as one single resource, and therefore are managed in closest possible coordination, in order to maximize overall benefits from water at the short and at the long term.

Conjunctive Water Management is an approach to water resources manage­ment in which surface water, groundwater and other components of the water cycle are considered as one single resource, and therefore are managed in closest possible coordination, in order to maximize overall benefits from water at the short and at the long term.

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