The world is facing challenges related to population growth, surface water scarcity, and more importantly, to the increasing dependency on shared groundwater resources.

Some of the world’s most iconic glaciers are set to disappear by 2050, according to this new study by UNESCO, which highlights the accelerated melting of glaciers in World Heritage sites.

This publication on Youth and Water Security in Africa, which comprises 25-refereed articles co-authored by youth including female scientists primarily from Africa, derives from collaboration among UNESCO, the African Ministers’ Council on Water (AMCOW) and the International Science Council (ISC) Regional Office for Africa (ROA

The 2022 Gender Report presents fresh insights on progress towards gender parity in education with respect to access, attainment and learning. It showcases the results of a new model that provides coherent estimates, combining multiple sources of information, on completion rates.

While groundwater accounts for 99 per cent of all running freshwater on Earth, it is often undervalued, mismanaged, and overexploited, according to this report published by the UNESCO.

This book presents 28 real-life examples of managed aquifer recharge (MAR) from around the world, where, at village to state level, people have collaborated to improve quantity and quality of water supplies and buffer them against drought and emergencies.

Forests in at least 10 World Heritage sites have become net sources of carbon, due to pressure from human activity and climate change, according to a new report by the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

The book’s primary intention is to serve as a roadmap for professionals working in developing countries interested in the Nexus Water-Energy-Food-Ecosystems (WEFE) approach.

The theme for this third publication of the UNESCO i-WSSM Global Water Security Issues is the role of sound groundwater resources management and governance to achieve water security. As an underground resource, often called the invisible resource, groundwater is more difficult to quantify, assess and monitor than surface water resources.

Although spending on science has risen worldwide, greater investment is needed in the face of growing crises, the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) has recommended in a new report published.

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