A set of case studies was prepared as part of the World Bank’s Water Global Practice initiative 'Wastewater. Shifting paradigms: from waste to resource' to document existing experiences in the water sector on the topic.

Mobilizing investments by institutional investors, foreign and domestic, is a requisite for India to meet its clean energy targets. India needs an additional ~450 billion of capital by 2040 to reach ~480GW of renewable energy capacity.

Uttar Pradesh, India’s most populous state, is home to the country’s largest number of people without electricity access: as of late 2017, 14.6 million households—49 per cent of the state’s total—are yet to be electrified.

On November 4 2016, the Paris Agreement entered into force. To date, 190 countries have submitted 164 nationally determined contributions (NDCs) outlining their own goals and methods to reduce emissions in common effort to limit global temperature increases this century.

Governments are not doing anywhere near enough, anywhere near fast enough, to make clean water, decent sanitation and good hygiene (WASH) normal for everyone, everywhere by 2030. Despite progress around the world to increase access to these basic needs, 844 million people still don’t have access to clean water and decent toilets.

Placing Asian economies onto a sustainable development pathway requires an unprecedented shift in investment away from greenhouse gas, fossil fuel, and natural resource-intensive industries toward more resource-efficient technologies and business models. The financial sector will have to play a central role in this green transformation.

A task force constituted by Niti Aayog on biomass management has pitched for providing financial support to those farmers who have not burnt their crop residues. The burning of agricultural residues leads to poor air quality across Northern India.

Improved national financial monitoring systems will increase accountability on climate change spending and foster transparency for global efforts to reach the goals outlined through the Paris Agreement and 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, according to a joint study issued today by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the L

The National Action Plan on Climate Change (NAPCC) of India recognized the role of state and local governments in its implementation. It was clear that adaptation and mitigation challenges will only be addressed if state governments play an active role in the planning and implementation process.

India has the potential for a large-scale energy transition, i.e. the rapid transition away from fossil fuels and towards renewable energy. The country has set for itself ambitious renewable energy targets, with government policy intending to achieve 175 GW of installed renewable energy capacity by 2022.

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