WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S.

Ever increasing power demand coupled with CO2 emission from coal-based power plants is a critical challenge for worldwide energy sector. This is even more critical for a country like India where a large coal reserve exists and about 60% of the total power produced is from coal. Meeting energy demand and simultaneously satisfying CO2 emissions target, India has to develop power from coal using more advanced technology than existing subcritical pulverized coal fired one. IGCC with CO2 capture emerges as a prospective option for using coal with reduced CO2 emissions.

Ecosystem carbon carrying capacity (CCC) is determined by prevailing climate and natural disturbance regimes, conditions that are projected to change significantly. The interaction of changing climate and its effects on disturbance regimes is expected to affect forest regeneration and growth, which may diminish forest carbon (C) stocks and uptake. We modeled landscape C dynamics over 590 years along the latitudinal gradient of the U.S. Sierra Nevada Mountains under climate and area burned by large wildfires projected by late 21st century.

Each year, the IEA’s Tracking Clean Energy Progress (TCEP) report examines developments across a range of clean energy sectors and technologies. The TCEP uses benchmarks for 2025 as modelled in Energy Technology Perspectives 2017, as well as the milestones identified in the IEA Technology Roadmaps.

A radical transformation in the way energy is supplied and used will be needed if the world is to meet its ambition of keeping global temperature increase to below 2 degrees Celsius, but the impacts of that transformation on the environment and on natural resources have been unclear.

Limiting the rise in global mean temperature to well below 2°C would require an energy transition of exceptional scope, depth and speed, according to an analysis by the International Energy Agency, including a doubling of annual average energy-related investments from current levels.

The use of wood for electricity generation and heat in modern (non-traditional) technologies has grown rapidly in recent years. For its supporters, it represents a relatively cheap and flexible way of supplying renewable energy, with benefits to the global climate and to forest industries.

This study, ‘Forest Carbon Assessment in Chitwan-Annapurna Landscape (CHAL) for REDD+ Readiness Activities’ presents the comprehensive baseline of forest carbon stock in CHAL with a detailed assessment of carbon sequestration potential, carbon-capture, permanency, leakage, and risks from the forest coverage.

This report was produced in partnership between Carbon Tracker and the Grantham Institute at Imperial College London. This study analyses the potential for continued cost reductions in solar photovoltaics (PV) and electric vehicle (EV) technologies to displace demand for currently dominant fossil fuels and mitigate CO2 emissions.

China currently has around 900 GW of installed coal-fired power capacity, representing potential emissions of 85 billion tonnes of CO2 if these plants continue to operate at current levels. Meanwhile under the global climate negotiations, China has committed to peaking its CO2 emissions by 2030.

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