Carbon capture and storage (CCS) continues to make significant progress around the world against a backdrop of greater climate action from countries and private companies. The Global Status of CCS 2021 demonstrates the critical role of CCS as nations and industry accelerate to net-zero.

CCS is one of many climate mitigating technologies that is mature, commercially available, and absolutely necessary to achieve global net-zero ambitions and a stable climate. The total installed CCS capacity must increase 100-fold by 2050 to limit global warming to below 2° Celsius.

For CCS to fulfill its potential in reducing significant global emissions, this technology must be deployed in all parts of the world. Yet there are currently very few CCS projects in developing countries.

The Global Status of CCS Report 2020 demonstrates the vital role of carbon capture and storage technologies (CCS) in reducing emissions to net-zero by 2050 as well as documenting the current status and important milestones for the technology over the past 12 months.

In a new report published by the Global CCS Institute, CCS legal and regulatory expert Ian Havercroft looks at the relationship between carbon capture and storage and ESG assessments. Public interest surrounding environmental, social and corporate governance considerations taken by companies is on the rise.

The 2019 Global Status of CCS report documents important milestones for CCS over the past 12 months, its status across the world and the key opportunities and benefits the technology presents.

A growing global population and rising living standards are producing ever greater quantities of municipal solid waste (MSW). This same growth in population and living standards is also driving ever-larger demand for energy, especially electricity.

The Global CCS Institute has released a new report highlighting strategic policy priorities for the large-scale deployment of carbon capture and storage (CCS).

An organization with members including ExxonMobil and the governments of Australia, the United Kingdom and the United States released a report arguing for the key role of carbon capture and storage in confronting the challenge of climate change.

Addition of a CO2 capture system to an existing power station has some impact on water consumption. CO2 capture systems require additional water for cooling and process make-up, which can be of concern, particularly in areas of water scarcity.

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