Limiting the rise in global mean temperature to well below 2°C would require an energy transition of exceptional scope, depth and speed, according to an analysis by the International Energy Agency, including a doubling of annual average energy-related investments from current levels.

The use of wood for electricity generation and heat in modern (non-traditional) technologies has grown rapidly in recent years. For its supporters, it represents a relatively cheap and flexible way of supplying renewable energy, with benefits to the global climate and to forest industries.

This study, ‘Forest Carbon Assessment in Chitwan-Annapurna Landscape (CHAL) for REDD+ Readiness Activities’ presents the comprehensive baseline of forest carbon stock in CHAL with a detailed assessment of carbon sequestration potential, carbon-capture, permanency, leakage, and risks from the forest coverage.

This report was produced in partnership between Carbon Tracker and the Grantham Institute at Imperial College London. This study analyses the potential for continued cost reductions in solar photovoltaics (PV) and electric vehicle (EV) technologies to displace demand for currently dominant fossil fuels and mitigate CO2 emissions.

China currently has around 900 GW of installed coal-fired power capacity, representing potential emissions of 85 billion tonnes of CO2 if these plants continue to operate at current levels. Meanwhile under the global climate negotiations, China has committed to peaking its CO2 emissions by 2030.

The world has witnessed a new era of cooperation on climate change between the United States and China. This cooperation between the world’s two largest economies and carbon emitters played a fundamental role in the international negotiations leading up to the adoption of the Paris Agreement in December 2015.

2015 saw a historic double success for sustainability and climate policy. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, with its Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), and the Paris Agreement on climate ­protection establish a system of ambitious policy goals for the world.

Rather than examining aggregate emissions trends, this study delves deep into the dynamics affecting each sector of the EU energy system. It examines the structural changes taking place in power production, transport, buildings and industry, and benchmarks these with the changes required to reach the 2030 and 2050 targets.

A new IEA publication highlights the critical role that carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies can play in meeting the climate goals set out in the Paris Agreement.

Low-carbon electricity generation, i.e. renewable energy, nuclear power and carbon capture and storage, is more capital intensive than electricity generation through carbon emitting fossil fuel power stations. High capital costs, expressed as high weighted average cost of capital (WACC), thus tend to encourage the use of fossil fuels. To achieve the same degree of decarbonization, countries with high capital costs therefore need to impose a higher price on carbon emissions than countries with low capital costs.

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