The world has witnessed a new era of cooperation on climate change between the United States and China. This cooperation between the world’s two largest economies and carbon emitters played a fundamental role in the international negotiations leading up to the adoption of the Paris Agreement in December 2015.

2015 saw a historic double success for sustainability and climate policy. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, with its Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), and the Paris Agreement on climate ­protection establish a system of ambitious policy goals for the world.

Rather than examining aggregate emissions trends, this study delves deep into the dynamics affecting each sector of the EU energy system. It examines the structural changes taking place in power production, transport, buildings and industry, and benchmarks these with the changes required to reach the 2030 and 2050 targets.

A new IEA publication highlights the critical role that carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies can play in meeting the climate goals set out in the Paris Agreement.

Low-carbon electricity generation, i.e. renewable energy, nuclear power and carbon capture and storage, is more capital intensive than electricity generation through carbon emitting fossil fuel power stations. High capital costs, expressed as high weighted average cost of capital (WACC), thus tend to encourage the use of fossil fuels. To achieve the same degree of decarbonization, countries with high capital costs therefore need to impose a higher price on carbon emissions than countries with low capital costs.

Emissions from Asian coal-fired power plants remain one of the more significant climate change challenges faced by the world community. Although China is beginning to reduce coal consumption it remains a key builder of thermal-coal plants with 250 Gigawatts still under construction.

New analysis from the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies finds that current plans to build new, and retrofit old, fossil fuel power plants in Japan would exceed CO2 emission estimates, derailing efforts to meet the country’s climate targets unless they operate at a lower capacity.

The energy landscape has changed with most countries achieving a more diversified energy mix as well as a growth in community ownerships and an evolution of micro grids.

Addition of a CO2 capture system to an existing power station has some impact on water consumption. CO2 capture systems require additional water for cooling and process make-up, which can be of concern, particularly in areas of water scarcity.

A study released by Oil Change International, in partnership with 14 organizations from around the world, scientifically grounds the growing movement to keep carbon in the ground by revealing the need to stop all new fossil fuel infrastructure and industry expansion.

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