This note present the results of Carbon Tracker’s coal power analysis for South Korea to understand stranded asset risk and relative economic competitiveness.

Fossil fuel companies risk wasting $1.6 trillion of expenditure by 2025 if they base their business on emissions policies already announced by governments instead of international climate goals, Carbon Tracker warns in a report, that models the IEA’s 1.75C scenario for the first time.

This report, produced by Carbon Tracker, Principles for Responsible Investment (UN PRI) and leading institutional investors, is the first to rank 69 of the biggest oil and gas industry companies according to the extent of their exposure to the low-carbon transition.

2020: The Climate Turning Point – the campaign will highlight why the 2020 turning point is necessary, and importantly how it can be realistically achieved, thanks to exponentially growing climate action.

This report was produced in partnership between Carbon Tracker and the Grantham Institute at Imperial College London. This study analyses the potential for continued cost reductions in solar photovoltaics (PV) and electric vehicle (EV) technologies to displace demand for currently dominant fossil fuels and mitigate CO2 emissions.

In the US, carbon-intensive sectors have made risk factor disclosures related to climate change for years but very little of it has been decision useful. This is in part due to the general nature of “risk factor” disclosure.

Hot on the heels of a historic climate deal in Paris the Carbon Tracker Initiative and the Climate Disclosure Standards Board, two non-profits who seek to promote transparency in relation to climate risk, will in Davos launch proposals for risk reporting by fossil fuel companies.

This report is designed to challenge the conventional thinking and linear models which dominate the current scenarios for energy futures. The greatest risks and opportunities will arise from more dramatic shifts rather than business as usual or incremental change.

The market for thermal coal is in structural decline in the United States. Squeezed out by an abundance of cheap shale gas and ever tightening pollution laws, it may be a harbinger of things to come for other fossil fuel markets globally. This report paints a bleak picture and makes grim reading for investors.

Since the beginning of the 21st century, China has accounted for over four-fifths of global coal consumption growth, half of which is thermal coal used predominantly to fuel China’s coal-fired power generation fleet.