Enable Block: 

This briefing outlines why long-term strategies are a fundamental component of national climate policy architecture, and how SIDS can benefit from developing one, both directly in terms of prioritising efforts for achieving the Paris Agreement goals, and indirectly through synergies with other sustainable development and resilience goals.

Small island developing states are particularly vulnerable to climate change, natural disasters, and external economic shocks.

Small island developing states are particularly vulnerable to climate change, natural disasters, and external economic shocks.

Most Small Island Developing States (SIDS) rely heavily on conventional fossil fuels for electricity generation and transport; however, renewables have the potential to deliver quick returns, decrease costs, create jobs and improve the local economy for many of these island states.

Most Small Island Developing States (SIDS) are still not eligible for concessional financing because they are classified as middle- or high-income countries. But they are more vulnerable than income data alone might suggest.

Small island developing states (SIDS) are among the most vulnerable countries to the impacts of the coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis, which is disrupting key economic sectors that SIDS’ undiversified and already fragile economies strongly rely upon.

There are 38 Small Island Developing States (SIDS) in the world, located in the Caribbean, Pacific and Atlantic-Indian-Ocean Mediterranean-South (AIMS) China Sea regions. The SIDS are on the front line of climate change, highly vulnerable to extreme weather events and sea-level rise.

Theory of Change (ToC) has become a common buzzword in climate adaptation circles in recent years. As a growing number of donors and financing entities require theories of change it can feel like yet another hoop to jump through, especially for Small Island Developing States (SIDS) where resources are limited and staff are often over-stretched.

The Global Water Partnership-Caribbean (GWP-Caribbean) and the Statistical Institute of Jamaica (STATIN) have issued a handbook that provides guidance on monitoring progress towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goal on clean water and sanitation (SDG 6) in the Caribbean region.

The least developed countries (LDCs), landlocked developing countries (LLDCs) and small island developing states (SIDS) are among the most vulnerable groups of countries in the world. They are disproportionately affected by the negative impacts of climate change due to their structural constraints and geographical disadvantage.

Pages