Watershed: A New Era of Water Governance in China represents a turning point, providing a practical set of recommendations to inform Government’s ongoing institutional reforms related to water management in the era of an ecological civilization.

In recent decades, many countries in sub-Saharan Africa have pursued national water permit systems, derived from the colonial era and reinforced by “global best practice.” These systems have proved logistically impossible to manage and have worsened inequality in water access.

This paper is part of an ongoing collaboration between the World Bank and the United Nations' Food and Agriculture Organization to raise awareness about the importance of water management in fragile systems and to propose strategic responses.

Water and Sanitation CS Simon Chelugui has a word with Meru governor Kiraitu Murungi and his Vihiga counterpart Wilber Otichilo during a consultative forum with the Council of Governors on the Nati

The vast majority of Europe’s rivers, lakes and estuaries have failed to meet minimum ecological standards for habitat degradation and pollution, according to a damning new report.

GANDHINAGAR: The long-pending and ambitious state water policy is finally ready and will be submitted by next week for the cabinet’s nod and adoption through notification.

Irrigated agriculture has once again risen to prominence among sub-Saharan Africa’s development priorities, after a long lull prompted by disappointment in the results of major investments during the 1970s and 1980s.

MUMBAI: The Bombay high court today asked the Maharashtra government to apprise it of the steps it proposes to take to curb pollution of rivers in the state.

Contamination of surface water sources due to the discharge of polluting substances has been a long standing problem in most parts of the country. In 1974, a legislation was specifically enacted to regulate and prohibit water pollution.

Despite the international recognition accorded to the key role played by women in issues around water, the extent to which India’s national water policies accommodate gender concerns remains to be examined. Based on an in-depth content analysis of the three nwps—of 1987, 2002, and 2012—this paper argues that incorporation of women in the planning, provisioning, and management of water resources continues to be disregarded.

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