People often fail to adhere to food-related health information. Increasing evidence suggests that environmental stimuli interfere with good intentions by triggering choices relatively automatically. Using a Pavlovian-instrumental transfer (PIT) task, we examined whether food-associated stimuli reduce health warnings’ effectiveness. We expected that people adhere to health warnings in the absence, but not presence, of food-associated stimuli.

A rise in adult obesity levels in the East Africa’s urban centres are taking a toll on efforts to tackle malnutrition, while undernourishment rates also remain a major concern.

Partly inconsistent findings from previous reviews have fueled discussions on the impact of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) on obesity development. The aim was to systematically review the recent evidence in children and adults. Methods: Data were retrieved from the databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane library for the period January 2013 to October 2015. A systematic review of prospective cohort studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) relating SSBs to weight measures was conducted.

The built environment might be associated with development of obesity and related disorders. We examined whether neighbourhood exposure to fast-food outlets and physical activity facilities were associated with adiposity in UK adults.

Original Source

The observational association between mortality and body mass index (BMI) is U-shaped, leading to highly publicized suggestions that moderate overweight is beneficial to health. However, it is unclear whether elevated mortality is caused by low BMI or if the association is confounded, for example by concurrent ill health.

Original Source

Although childhood overweight and obesity prevalence has increased substantially worldwide in the past three decades, scarce evidence exists for effective preventive strategies. The researchers aimed to establish whether a school-based intervention for children aged 9–10 years would prevent excessive weight gain after 24 months.

Original Source

Lifestyle diseases or non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are responsible for more than 61 per cent of all deaths in India.

Whether it is heart diseases, respiratory illnesses, cancer, obesity or food allergies, emerging research reveals that the rise in their incidences is due to environmental factors—rapid urbanisation, air pollution and changes in diet—rather than your genes.

The new report from Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) released yesterday held lifestyle diseases like obesity, mental health, cancer and heart diseases to count a few, as the major killers in India. Revealing the links of air pollution with mental diseases, it stated that air pollution is responsible for 30 per cent of premature deaths in India while every third child in Delhi has impaired lungs.

When a condition commonly associated with a lifetime of alcohol abuse — severe scarring of the liver, or cirrhosis — starts to show up in children as young as eight, something is very wrong.

Original Source

The objective of the study was to study the serum Homocysteine levels in children and its relation with body mass index (BMI), lipid profile and plasma glucose.

Original Source

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