A seven month-long survey conducted by a gynecologist in various schools and colleges of Navi Mumbai to find out the risk factors associated with changing lifestyles showed that the main causes for

The aim of this study was to examine cross-sectional associations between objectively measured sedentary time and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-assessed adiposity in a population at high risk for type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and to determine whether associations are modified by the recommended levels of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA).

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The built environment might be associated with development of obesity and related disorders. We examined whether neighbourhood exposure to fast-food outlets and physical activity facilities were associated with adiposity in UK adults.

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Thirty per cent of all premature deaths in the country are due to air pollution.

Although childhood overweight and obesity prevalence has increased substantially worldwide in the past three decades, scarce evidence exists for effective preventive strategies. The researchers aimed to establish whether a school-based intervention for children aged 9–10 years would prevent excessive weight gain after 24 months.

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Diabetes and high body-mass index (BMI) are associated with increased risk of several cancers, and are increasing in prevalence in most countries. Researchers estimated the cancer incidence attributable to diabetes and high BMI as individual risk factors and in combination, by country and sex.

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The CSE report, “Body Burden: Lifestyle Diseases”, estimated that India had 22.2 million chronic COPD patients and around 35 million chronic asthma patients in 2016.

Experts say foods high in salt, sugar and fat are leading to rise in such ailments

Lifestyle diseases or non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are responsible for more than 61 per cent of all deaths in India.

Whether it is heart diseases, respiratory illnesses, cancer, obesity or food allergies, emerging research reveals that the rise in their incidences is due to environmental factors—rapid urbanisation, air pollution and changes in diet—rather than your genes.

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