As low-income countries develop, people’s diets change. They tend to move from being high in cereals (maize, rice, wheat), starchy staples (potato, cassava, plantain) and fibre, to more westernised patterns that are high in sugars, fats and animal-source foods. This has been termed the nutrition transition.

The main objective of this report is to identify interventions that work and recommend options for policies and programs to eliminate hunger and malnutrition in all its forms. The report begins with a review of the African and global policy agenda, setting out the challenges and complexity of addressing all forms of malnutrition in Africa.

Visakhapatnam: Underfed children are not the only ones who are malnourished.

To be able to curb the global pandemic of physical inactivity and the associated 5.3 million deaths per year, we need to understand the basic principles that govern physical activity. However, there is a lack of large-scale measurements of physical activity patterns across free-living populations worldwide. Here we leverage the wide usage of smartphones with built-in accelerometry to measure physical activity at the global scale. We study a dataset consisting of 68 million days of physical activity for 717,527 people, giving us a window into activity in 111 countries across the globe.

The report, “What makes urban food policy happen?”, features case studies from five cities on four continents.

PATNA: Blame it on urban lifestyle, intake of junk food and lack of physical activities, obesity in children is increasing with each passing day.

As a partner in nurturing children along with the parents, schools should take the responsibility of health management for students.

India has the second highest number of obese children in the world after China, according to an alarming study which found that 14.4 million kids in the country have excess weight.

Obesity levels in India have more than doubled in children and tripled in adults over the past three decades, according to a new study that health experts say underscores India's twin challenges of

The prevalence of overweight and obesity is increasing worldwide.1 Epidemiologic studies have identified high body-mass index (BMI, the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters) as a risk factor for an expanding set of chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease,2,3 diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease,2 many cancers,4 and an array of musculoskeletal disorders.5,6 As the global health community works to develop treatments and prevention policies to address obesity, timely information about levels of high BMI and health effects at the population level is

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