Given the scale of unmet need and the constraints of India’s low government budgets, it will be essential that India’s universal health coverage (UHC) strategy is efficient and equitable. India must invest heavily in primary health care (PHC) services, where health returns are greatest.

The Government of India recently launched the ambitious National Health Protection Mission, also referred to as Ayushman Bharat, Pradhan Mantri Jan Arogya Yojana, or Modicare. This scheme has two main pillars: strengthening of universal comprehensive primary health care and a health insurance scheme to cover 500 million people in need to reduce catastrophic out-of-pocket health spending.

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There is a gap in TB cases registered and those opting for directly observed treatment (DOT) at civic or state hospitals. MUMBAI: The number of Mumbaikars dropping out of TB treatment (DOTS) increased from 12% in 2013 to 15% in 2017, according to data released by NGO Prajay.

Chandigarh: Dr Ram Kumar, convener, Society for Promotion of Ethical & Affordable Healthcare on Saturday said the budgetary allocation to health sector is not only less, but it is also not stee

Order of the Uttaranchal High Court in the matter of Dr. Vijay Verma Vs Union of India & Others dated 01/06/2018 regarding the situation of mentally disturbed children in the State of Uttarakhand.

AHMEDABAD: For providing medical facilities on islands along the Gujarat coast, the Gujarat high court has said that these places can be considered as “difficult areas” and norms for providing prim

AHMEDABAD: Gujarat high court has said that the norms of setting up health centres on islands can be fixed separately like the norms the government has fixed for health centres in mountains or hill

T.N., Maharashtra among better performing States

Ideally, a strong primary healthcare system must precede any financial protection intervention at scale for hospitalisation costs.

Health programmes that are using mobile phones to improve maternal health in rural India are examined. Presented by its promoters as a universal, accessible and “smart” empowering technology, how mobile devices transform gender inequalities on the ground is analysed. By using empirical data collected on a global mHealth programme deployed in Bihar, how mHealth devices negate the multifactorial dimension of gender and health inequalities is explained, and also how these devices can reinforce inequalities on the ground is examined.

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