The ability of Sub-Saharan Africa’s economies to generate enough jobs for its young and growing population rests on the successful implementation of urgent reforms to boost productivity. This is the key finding of the Africa Competitiveness Report 2017.

The biggest challenge for India is the dual fight of containing a 'developing' country's health concerns while a flare-up of 'developed' world disorders are its doorstep. On one hald India is combating basic health concerns such as malnutrition, low immunization rates, hygiene, sanitation and infectious diseases.

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development commits to promoting development in a balanced way – economically, socially and environmentally – in all countries of the world, leaving no one behind, and paying special attention to those people who are poorest or most excluded.

The publication Youth in India attempts to identify the issues of importance for youth under the broad categories- Population dynamics, marital statistics, fertility & contraception, Mortality & Neonatal Health care, Literacy & Employment and Crime.

Demographic change is one of the powerful forces transforming the world economy. As global population growth slows and urbanization plateaus in many regions, the outlook for cities and their growth changes profoundly.

It is fitting that the United Nations Habitat III conference in October will be held in Quito, Ecuador. In April, the city and nearby Portoviejo and Manta suffered an earthquake that killed more than 660 people and injured at least 10,000. Around 73,000 people were displaced. Some 700,000 needed emergency assistance, such as drinking water, sanitation and hygiene kits. Many water-supply systems and hospitals were destroyed or disrupted. Insurance companies estimated the damage at US$2.5 billion, of which only 16% was insured.

Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) has embarked on a new era of dam building to improve food security and promote economic development. Nonetheless, the future impacts of dams on malaria transmission are poorly understood and seldom investigated in the context of climate and demographic change.

Original Source

Children in Africa will on current trends account for 43% of global poverty by 2030, almost double the current share, due to a combination of demographic change, deep poverty and extreme inequality, warns a new report from the Overseas Development Institute.

The world population will reach 9.9 billion in 2050, up 33 percent from an estimated 7.4 billion now, according to projections included in the latest World Population Data Sheet from the Population

Human pressures on the environment are changing spatially and temporally, with profound implications for the planet’s biodiversity and human economies. Here we use recently available data on infrastructure, land cover and human access into natural areas to construct a globally standardized measure of the cumulative human footprint on the terrestrial environment at 1 km2 resolution from 1993 to 2009. We note that while the human population has increased by 23% and the world economy has grown 153%, the human footprint has increased by just 9%.

Pages