Family size is closely linked to reproductive rights, according to the State of World Population 2018 report.

Sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) are essential for sustainable development because of their links to gender equality and women’s wellbeing, their impact on maternal, newborn, child, and adolescent health, and their roles in shaping future economic development and environmental sustainability. Yet progress towards fulfilling SRHR for all has been stymied because of weak political commitment, inadequate resources, persistent discrimination against women and girls, and an unwillingness to address issues related to sexuality openly and comprehensively.

For the first time in the Anthropocene, the global demographic and economic trends that have resulted in unprecedented destruction of the environment are now creating the necessary conditions for a possible renaissance of nature. Drawing reasonable inferences from current patterns, we can predict that 100 years from now, the Earth could be inhabited by between 6 and 8 billion people, with very few remaining in extreme poverty, most living in towns and cities, and nearly all participating in a technologically driven, interconnected market economy.

Theoretically, population growth is believed to increase greenhouse gas emissions, particularly CO2 emissions through the increase in human activities. Accordingly, this study aimed to investigate this assertion in Nigeria using an autoregressive distributed lag model covering periods from 1971-2000, 1971-2005, and 1971-2010 recursively. The results indicated that population was not a determinant of CO2 emissions in all the three periods in the long run.

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The United Nations Population Fund West and Central Africa Regional Office (UNFPA WCARO), in collaboration with the African Group of Ambassadors in Dakar, is to present its 2017 progress report on the state of the demographic dividend.

The combined effects of rising heat and humidity will affect India's northeast the most in the world close to the end of the century, warns this new study published in Environmental Research Letters.

The projected expansion in Africa’s child population will necessitate an increase of more than 11 million skilled education and health personnel by 2030, if it is to keep pace with the continent’s unprecedented demographic transition, UNICEF said.

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) underscore the need to address broad inequalities in their quest to ‘leave no-one behind.’ Income Inequality Trends in sub-Saharan Africa: Divergence, Determinants, and Consequences is a groundbreaking United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) study tha

Today's over-60 population is the fastest growing group. Currently, there are around 962 million people aged 60 or over, representing 12.3 per cent of the global population. By 2050, this will increase to 2.1 billion or 21.5 per cent of the global population. But are we taking care of them?

Between 2014 and 2050, India is projected to add 404 million urban dwellers and the number of rural residents is expected to decline by 52 million.

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