A Congress delegation from Karnataka, headed by its opposition leader in the assembly Siddaramaiah, will meet President Pratibha Patil on August 16 to plead her not to give assent to the anti-cow slaughter bill.

Two days ago, Chief Minister B S Yeddyurappaa had met the President seeking assent for the Bill, which is also being opposed by JDS.

Yagnesh Mehta | TNN

Bangalore: The controversial Karnataka Prevention of Slaughter and Preservation of Cattle Bill, 2010, passed by the Bharatiya Janata Party government amid protests, has been reserved by Governor H.R. Bhardwaj for consideration of the President.

Milind Ghatwai

The Madhya Pradesh Assembly on Thursday passed a stringent legislation that punishes cow slaughter with a minimum jail term of one year and a maximum of seven years.

The Madhya Pradesh Prohibition of Cow Slaughter (Amendment) Bill, 2010, punishes offences like storing or transporting beef with a minimum term of six months, which can be extended up to three years.

Madhya Pradesh Animal Husbandry Minister Ajay Vishnoi today said in the Assembly that the government was committed to protect the cows and cattle in the state.

The passage of cow slaughter ban bill by the Assembly has put the farmers of the taluk in a fix. They are now saddled with the burden of maintaining unyielding and aged cattle.

The passage of cow slaughter ban bill by the Assembly has put the farmers of the taluk in a fix. They are now saddled with the burden of maintaining unyielding and aged cattle.

The Movement against Karnataka Prevention of Slaughter and Preservation of Cattle Bill had organised a protest in front of the DC office urging the government to withdraw the bill.

As many as 150 organisations will participate in a huge convention at Malleswaram on July 20 at 11 am, to lay pressure on the Legislative Council to pass the Bill against cow slaughter.

Addressing a press conference, Dayananda Swami said cows are significant from religious point of view and are pivotal to rural economy, as they help generate additional income.

After years of defensiveness, a siege mentality and the stonewalling of any criticism, a quiet revolution is under way in animal research. What has triggered this change of heart? It's partly down to the economic climate plus fewer new medicines - despite increased investment in research - and the removal of much of the threat from animal rights extremism, in the UK at least. (Editorial)

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