New report urges global action on mining pollution. Mining Tailings Storage: Safety is no accident, was prompted by tailings dams disasters and rising global concerns about the safety, management and impacts of storing and managing large volumes of mine tailings.

Mosul Dam is located on the Tigris river, 50 Km NW of Mosul; it is 113 m in height, 3.4 Km in length, 10 m wide in its crest and has a storage capacity of 11.1 billion cubic meters. It is an earth fill dam, constructed on bedrocks of Fat’ha Formation, which consists of gypsum beds alternated with marl and limestone, in cyclic nature. The thickness of gypsum beds attains 18 m; they are intensely karstified even in foundation rocks. Therefore, continuous grouting Programme was planned during construction, which was completed in June 1984, with planned operation age of 80 years.

This guidelines deal with the preparation of site specific seismic study report of a river valley project and its submission to the National Committee on Seismic Design Parameters (NCSDP) for necessary approval.

Standing Committee on Water Resources (2010-2011) present this Seventh Report on "The Dam Safety Bill, 2010". The Bill was introduced in Lok Sabha and was referred by the Hon‘ble Speaker to the Standing Committee on Water Resources on 9 September, 2010 for examining and Report.

This bill introduced in Lok Sabha is aimed at setting up an institutional system for regular monitoring of safety of large dams.  It is to provide for proper surveillance, inspection, operation and maintenance of all dams of  certain parameters in India to ensure their safe functioning and for matters connected
therewith or incidental thereto.

The coffer dam is being built for the 99 MW Chuzachen hydro electric project developed by GATI Infrastructure. As per the preliminary information, the labourers were working in the coffer dam in the night shift when the dam suddenly burst

Mosul dam is one of the biggest hydraulic structures in Iraq. It is located on Tigris River north Iraq and was selected as a case study to predict flood disasters caused by a hypothetical Mosul dam failure due to its foundation defect in which the dam had been survive since 1986 (initial time of dam operation).

The water-harvesting structures constructed in six villages to provide irrigation and agriculture sustainability in the area have proved to be a bane for villagers as the dams have not been desilted since their inception.

Floods are the most destructive, most frequent and most costly natural disasters on earth. Flood damages have soared in recent decades, despite hundreds of billions of dollars spent on flood control structures. This is partly because global warming is causing more severe storms, and partly because of growing populations and economic activity on floodplains. It is also because flood control technologies and approaches often prove counterproductive. This report explains the failure of dams and levees to stop rising flood damages and describes better ways to tackle flood management.

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