Six Killed As Mahanadi Floods Five Coastal Districts Of State
Rajaram Satapathy | TNN

An aerial view of flood-hit Manikpur in Boudh districtExpress New Service 20 Sep 2008

10:44:00 AM ISTBHUBANESWAR: As a swelling Mahanadi began to submerge vast tracts in the deltaic regions carrying an overwhelming 15 lakh cusec water, Orissa watched with awe the devastation nature

DESPERATE EFFORT: A villager holds on to a telephone post while trying to collect floating sticks to be used for cooking, at the Naraj barrage on the Kathjodi river in Cuttack on Friday.

BHUBANESWAR: Over six lakh people were affected in different parts of Orissa following floods in the Mahanadi and other rivers.

The paper presents the outcomes of a study conducted to analyse water resources availability and demand in the Mahanadi River Basin in India under climate change conditions. Climate change impact analysis was carried out for the years 2000, 2025, 2050, 2075 and 2100, for the months of September and April (representing wet and dry months), at a sub-catchment level. A physically based distributed hydrologic model (DHM) was used for estimation of the present water availability.

Look at the contours of the disastrous consequences of the current Orissa floods in Mahanadi River basin: According to Engineer in Chief, Water Resources Department of Orissa, this is the worst floods in Orissa since 1982. The reason behind this

It used to be one of the most unforgettable sights from the height of the Indian summer: thousands of the world-famous Olive Ridley turtles waddling out of the water to nest and breed on the pristine white sand beaches of Gahirmatha in Orissa on magical, moonlit nights. Not just the Olive Ridleys, most other species of turtle also emerge of their hibernation spanning winters and begin mating and looking for proper nesting places.

Call it brand affinity. Kolkata-based Turtle, the men

The discharge of municipal sewage, industrial effluents and biomedical waste into the Mahanadi has raised concerns about environmental sustainability and also posed a serious threat to the health of people living on the banks. This article critically examines the river pollution caused by the spiralling urbanisation and industrialisation along with dumping of waste by many medical facilities. There is an urgent need to address this enormous challenge which is a direct outcome of inefficient planning and management.

Western Orissa is witnessing an upheaval. In the eye of the storm is the Hirakud dam. Over 300,000 farmers dependent on its water for irrigation are indignant that industries springing up around the dam are sucking away the water they had been waiting for

The challenge of development lies in balancing competing water demands

Pages