The guidelines on Swajal provide details of the scheme, implementation arrangements, financing provisions and roles and responsbilities of various stakeholders involved in its implementation. The guidelines have to be read in conjunction with National Rural Drinking water Programme issued by the Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation.

The Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation (MDWS) has commissioned “Swachh Sarvekshan Grameen-2018” (SSG, 2018) through an independent survey agency to develop ranking of all districts of India on the basis of quantitative and qualitative sanitation (Swachhata) parameters.

This was a preliminary observational study which aimed to examine whether there are any early observed differences in the health outcomes of the children from the selected ODF villages vis-à-vis. the selected non-ODF villages of the five Indian states - Karnataka, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh and West Bengal.

UNICEF was requested by the Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation to conduct a study to assess the economic impacts of the Swachh Bharat Gramin in rural areas.

UNICEF was requested by the Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation to conduct a study to assess the economic impacts of the Swachh Bharat Gramin in rural areas.

The report aims to assess the current status of rural sanitation coverage and usage of toilets at a pan India level as well as at state level. It also provides an independent evaluation of the progress made so far under Swachh Bharat Mission (Gramin).

The National Annual Rural Sanitation Survey (NARSS) 2017-18, conducted by an Independent Verification Agency (IVA) under the World Bank support project to the Swachh Bharat Mission Gramin (SBM-G), has found that 93.4% of the households in rural India who have access to a toilet use it.

The Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation has updated the existing guidelines for Swachh Bharat Mission (Gramin). The revised guidelines aims to help the States/UTs and other stakeholders to find all the important decisions, advisories of the Ministry at one place and provide an improved understanding of the programme.

About 76 percent of rural habitations in India have achieved a fully covered (FC) status, under the National Rural Drinking Water Program, with basic minimum service level of 40 liters per capita daily (lpcd), but this coverage is primarily through hand-pumps and does not necessarily translate into sustainable and good quality service delivery.

Water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) directly impact human health and have far reaching consequences when ignored. India is one of the fastest developing economies, but when it comes to WASH indicators, it continues to lag behind. With a population of over 1.2 billion, there is a mounting and urgent need to address sanitation.

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