The International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) has launched a report titled, ‘Women as Change-makers in the Governance of Shared Waters,’ highlighting the role of women in transboundary water governance.

The sea below 200 meters depth accounts for 95% of the volume of the ocean, making it the largest habitat for life on Earth. Though it is perpetually cold, generally dark, and subject to extreme pressures, the deep sea contains a wealth of unique and unusual species, habitats and ecosystems.

‘Invasive species’ (often called pests, weeds and diseases) are plants, animals, disease agents and other organisms taken beyond their natural range by people, deliberately or unintentionally, and which become destructive to the environment or human livelihoods.

More than 1.5 billion smallholders throughout the world depend on forest landscapes to produce food, fuel, timber and non-wood forest products to meet their subsistence needs and generate cash income.

The situation analysis primarily focuses on oil palm in the context of biodiversity conservation based on literature published before 31 January 2018, and aims to provide a constructive pathway to addressing sustainability challenges in the palm oil industry.

The protection and revival of degraded and deforested land is the need of the hour. In order to tackle the issues that arise as a consequence of degradation and deforestation, principles of forest landscape restoration are being globally promoted.

Soil biodiversity and soil organic carbon are vital to the way ecosystems function and they largely determine the role of land in producing food, storing water, and mitigating climate change. This report highlights how soil organic carbon and soil biodiversity provide the foundation for terrestrial ecosystem services.

Biodiversity is inherent in forest landscape restoration. As global initiatives like the Bonn Challenge and New York Declaration on Forests inspire nations to pursue sustainable landscapes and economic growth, on the ground, biodiversity binds people and nature to their shared future.

76% of freshwater species endemic to the basin are threatened with extinction, and the risk of species extinctions is increasing. Without immediate action, much of this unique biodiversity will be lost and the livelihoods of many people in the basin will be negatively impacted.

The Lake Victoria Basin is internationally recognised for its high freshwater species diversity and endemism, which are of critical importance to local livelihoods and national economies within the basin.

Pages