The high court at Jabalpur on Friday removed a stay of more than seven years on a lower court’s order of summons to Dow Chemicals in the US on the Bhopal gas disaster of November 1984.

The gas, kiling thousands, leaked from the Union Carbide factory in Bhopal. Dow later acquired Union Carbide. In January 2005, the chief judicial magistrate in Bhopal had issued an order of summons on Dow Chemical Company in the US, to produce Carbide officials. On an appeal filed by Dow’s Indian subsidiary, the order was stayed by the HC in March of that year. On Friday, that stay was removed and an order issued to summon Dow in the US (Carbide was merged into it in 2001).

The Plantation Corporation of Kerala, the public sector company promoting cash crops, has decided to seek State Government’s permission to move court against the manufactures of Endosulfan, which includes public sector firms like Hindustan Insecticides Limited (HIL).

Endosulfan is an off-patent pesticide recently banned in the country for its toxic effects on humans. According to the corporation chairman Varghese George, the manufacturers were actually responsible for the tragedy that had struck several villages in Kasaragod. Mr George was referring to large-scale congenital deformities reported in Kasaragod district.

High levels of nitrate, lead and nickel have been found present in the groundwater samples collected by the Indian Institute of Toxicology Research at the Union Carbide site in Bhopal.

The Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (IITR) has informed the Supreme Court that groundwater around the Union Carbide factory in Bhopal is contaminated.

In an interim report submitted before the Bench of Justices Altamas Kabir and J. Chelameswar, the IITR said 30 samples were collected from the disaster site. Nitrate level in nine samples exceeded the permissible limit prescribed by the Bureau of Indian Standards for drinking water and lead beyond the limit was found in 24.

Public outrage seems to have got better of scientific opinion when it comes to disposing of over 350 tonnes of toxic waste on the Union Carbide's now-defunct premises at Bhopal.

Germany has become the latest address to reject a parcel from the now defunct plant of Union Carbide in Bhopal, even before it began its journey.

The Supreme Court directs the Central and Madhya Pradesh governments and the ICMR to address the health needs of the Bhopal gas victims.

Of 17 recommendations of AERB, only six have been complied with, he says

The safety measures recommended by the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) are crucial and the Kudankulam nuclear power plant should not be allowed to be commissioned without implementing these measures, argued counsel Prashant Bhushan in the Supreme Court on Thursday. Appearing for petitioner G. Sundararajan, social activist, he submitted before a Bench of Justices K.S. Radhakrishnan and Dipak Misra that the AERB had recommended 17 safety measures, of which only six were complied with and 11 yet to be put in place.

It’s back to square one in the mission to get rid of toxic waste from Union Carbide’s pesticide plant in Bhopal, with German agency GIZ backing out of a proposal to airlift 350 tonnes of waste to Europe for safe disposal.

After three months of extensive contract negotiations with the Indian government, the firm has said: “Hazardous waste disposal through GIZ is no longer an option.” In a statement on why the contract did not materialise, GIZ said “uncertainties [which] extended to the German public” had grown during the months of struggling to close the deal.

Protests in Germany have ensured that the refuse cannot be taken to Europe either

It’s back to square one in the mission to get rid of toxic waste from Union Carbide’s pesticide plant in Bhopal, with German agency GIZ backing out of a proposal to airlift 350 tonnes of waste to Europe for safe disposal. After three months of extensive contract negotiations with the Indian government, the firm on Monday said: “Hazardous waste disposal through GIZ is no longer an option.” In a statement on why the contract did not materialise, GIZ said “uncertainties [which] extended to the German public” had grown during the months of struggling to close the deal.

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