The WTO is central to achieving the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which set targets to be achieved by 2030 in areas such as poverty reduction, health, education and the environment.

The World Trade Report 2014 looks at how four recent major economic trends have changed how developing countries can use trade to facilitate their development.

The dispute outlined in China's panel request is one of the most extensive in the history of the World Trade Organization.

The WTO’s Bali Ministerial Conference concluded a day later than scheduled on December 7, 2013, with agreement on a package of issues designed to streamline trade, allow developing countries more options for providing food security, boost least developed countries’ trade and help development more generally.

International trade is a key component of sustainable development. This brochure offers a set of messages on sustainable development and trade that may be pronounced at the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (commonly known as Rio+20), which will take place in Brazil in June 2012.

The World Trade Report is an annual publication that aims to deepen understanding about trends in trade, trade policy issues and the multilateral trading system. The 2011 World Trade Report is split into two main parts. The first is a brief summary of the trade situation in 2010.

As governments increasingly adopt policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, concern has grown on two fronts. First, carbon leakage can occur when mitigation policies are not the same across countries and producers seek to locate in jurisdictions where production costs are least affected by emission constraints.

The World Trade Report 2010 focuses on trade in natural resources, such as fuels, forestry, mining and fisheries. The Report examines the characteristics of trade in natural resources, the policy choices available to governments and the role of international cooperation, particularly of the WTO, in the proper management of trade in this sector.

One of the main objectives of this Report is to analyze whether WTO provisions provide a balance between supplying governments with necessary flexibility to face difficult economic situations and adequately defining them in a way that limits their use for protectionist purposes.

This report aims to improve understanding about the linkages between trade and climate change. It shows that trade intersects with climate change in a multitude of ways. The report begins with a summary of the current state of scientific knowledge on climate change and on the options available for responding to the challenge of climate change.

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