During 2014-2017 India was shaken by severe spells of drought that hit over 500 million people across geographical regions. Unlike in the past, these droughts did not spare the urban areas; metropolitan cities like Chennai, Hyderabad and Bengaluru declared water emergency and several towns resorted to water rationing. “Drought But Why?” examines how an occupational hazard has turned into a human-made disaster of unmanageable proportion since organised agriculture began some 10,000 years ago.

Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) released the first detailed independent evaluation and analysis of the Pradhan Mantri Fasal Bima Yojana (PMFBY) – government’s flagship national agricultural insurance programme.

Pradhan Mantri Fasal Bima Yojana (PMFBY) is not suitable for vulnerable regions like Marathwada, finds the first detailed independent evaluation and analysis of government’s flagship programme,  released by Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) at Delhi. 

Centre for Science and Environment has carried out this simple and indicative exercise to assess the impact of congestion on travel time and traffic speed on Delhi’s major arterial roads which have been specially designed to give priority and primacy to improve speed of vehicular movement.

For daily commuters in Delhi, what has been the experience is now being borne by hard statistics. Centre for Science and Environment’s (CSE) new assessment of travel time and traffic speed in Delhi shows the city is in a grip of a worsening congestion and pollution crisis.

Wood is an important natural resource.

The thermal power sector has made very little progress in implementing the revised stack emission standards for suspended particulate matter (SPM), sulphur dioxide (SO2) and oxide(s) of nitrogen (NOx) notified in December 2015.

State of India's Environment 2017 In Figures is India's first and only e-book that not only communicates environmental issues through facts and figures, but arms readers with insights and perspectives to help you form an informed opinion on issues that matter.

On World Environment Day, Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) is re-emphasising the crisis that we are faced with today – by releasing the results of a study it has done to find out how India has warmed over the years. The analysis looks at temperature trends in the country – both annual and seasonal – from 1901 till recent years.

On World Environment Day, CSE releases analysis of how India has warmed over the years - from 1901 till 2017. First animated climate spiral showing the warming of India. Annual mean temperature in India has increased by 1.2 degrees C since the beginning of the 20th century. 2016 was second warmest year on record with temperature of 1.26 degrees C higher than. Winters (Jan-Feb) of 2017 was hottest in recorded history with temperature of 2.95 degrees higher than the baseline.

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