Hunting wild animals for food and recreational sports like hiking and mountain biking pose the two biggest threats to the world’s protected areas, a new study shows.

Nagpur: Record a GIB sighting and get Rs 500!

Harsh Shah, an animal welfare officer nominated by the Environment Ministry validates these claims.

KENDRAPARA: The Bhitarkanika National Park in Odisha's Kendrapara district has played host to over one lakh migrant water birds this year.

Bengaluru: The animal husbandry and health and family welfare departments will continue the sanitation and disinfection drive at Dasarahalli, Yelahanka, wherein a stray incidence of avian influenza

UDAIPUR: She feels at home in Rajasthan, especially in Dungarpur.

With the disturbing trend of rowdy picnickers near protected wildlife habitats showing little sign of abatement, conservationists have called for a complete stop to boisterous gatherings inside pr

Populations of the White-rumped Vulture Gyps bengalensis, Indian Vulture G. indicus and Slender-billed Vulture G. tenuirostris declined rapidly during the mid-1990s all over their ranges in the Indian subcontinent because of poisoning due to veterinary use of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac. This paper reports results from the latest in a series of road transect surveys conducted across northern, central, western and north-eastern India since the early 1990s. Results from the seven comparable surveys now available were analysed to estimate recent population trends.

The illegal killing and taking of wild birds remains a major threat on a global scale. However, there are few quantitative data on the species affected and countries involved. We quantified the scale and scope of this issue in Northern and Central Europe and the Caucasus, using a diverse range of data sources and incorporating expert knowledge. The issue was reported to be widespread across the region and affects almost all countries/territories assessed. We estimated that 0.4–2.1 million birds per year may be killed/taken illegally in the region.

Overfishing and changing sea temperatures are pushing seabirds to the brink of extinction, according to new data on the world's birds.

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