The deaths in Bhopal caused by Union Carbide's noxious fumes should not have happened at all. Equally unnecessary and unwarranted is the continuing suffering of those who managed to survive. Situations that caused a tragedy of such magnitude could and should have been averted.

This is the chapter of the State of India's Environment: the second citizen's report 1984-85.

On the night of 3rd December, 1984, Union Carbide tank 610, released 40 tonnes of lethal gas into Bhopal. What followed was the worst industrial disaster in human history. “Bhopal: A Prayer for Rain” is a movie set amidst that disaster. This 2 minute 45 second long trailer of the movie encompasses the horrifying darkness, the immense fear, and the bone chilling hopelessness of that night and the days that followed.

Bill to provide for civil liability for nuclear damage, appointment of claims commissioner, establishment of nuclear damage claims commission and for matters connected therewith or incidental thereto.

Sujay Mehdudia

NEW DELHI: An independent expert committee set up by the Petroleum and Natural Gas Ministry on Tuesday blamed lack of safety procedures and human error for the devastating fire in the Indian Oil Corporation's fuel depot in Jaipur that killed 11 people and injured 45 in October last year.

New Delhi: In the 25th year of the world

Milind Ghatwai

A day before the Bhopal gas tragedy completes 25 years, the Delhi-based Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) claimed that chemicals dumped in the Union Carbide plant continue to contaminate land and groundwater.

This is the letter by the Congress of United States, Washington to Chairman & CEO of Dow Chemical Company, Michigan, requesting that Dow ensures that a representative appear in the ongoing legal cases in India regarding Bhopal, that Dow meets the demands of the survivors for medical and economic rehabilitation, and cleans up the soil and groundwater contamination in and around the factory site.

Indian Oil Corporation is one of Asia

During the night of 2-3 December 1984, a leak of some 40 tons of methyl isocyanate (MIC) gas mixed with unknown other gasses from a chemical plant owned and operated by Union Carbide (India) Limited, a partly-owned subsidiary of the US-based Union Carbide Corporation, caused one of the highest-casualty industrial accidents of the 20th century.

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