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Two decades after its original publication, The Analysis of Household Surveys is reissued with a new preface by its author, Sir Angus Deaton, recipient of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences. This classic work remains relevant to anyone with a serious interest in using household survey data to shed light on policy issues.

There have been many development advances in recent decades. But our world is also undergoing major transformations and facing profound development challenges. These include extreme inequality, climate breakdown, gender injustice and the curtailment of civic freedoms.

Today, more than 8.1 million Nepalis live in poverty. Women and girls are more likely to be poor, despite the significant contribution they make to the economy, especially through unpaid care and household work. More than one-third of Nepal’s children under 5 years are stunted, and 10% suffer wasting due to acute malnutrition.

Understanding the magnitude and importance of income shocks, such as drought or conflict, in causing and perpetuating poverty is critical to designing policies aimed at building resilience and contributing toward the goal of ending poverty.

Global economic prospects have darkened. Financing conditions have tightened, industrial production has moderated, and trade tensions remain elevated. The recovery in emerging market and developing economies has stalled, and some countries have experienced significant financial stress.

Who are the world’s poor? This paper presents a new global profile of multidimensional poverty using three specifications of multidimensional poverty.

President Maithripala Sirisena has ordered officials to prepare a plan in the new year to alleviate poverty in the country.

Between May and July 2018, the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) implemented a household-level survey in four areas of PNG: the Autonomous Region of Bougainville (South Bougainville near Buin), Madang (Middle Ramu near Kwanga Station), East Sepik (near Maprik) and West Sepik (near Nuku).

“Multi-dimensional Child Deprivation in Ethiopia - First National Estimates,” the report studied child poverty in nine dimensions – development/stunting, nutrition, health, water, sanitation, and housing. Other dimensions included education, health related knowledge, and information and participation.

The poor already bear the brunt of these costs, and unhindered use of bidi tobacco threatens to push even more households into poverty, according to the study published in the journal Tobacco Contr

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