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This Malawi Economic Monitor (MEM) provides an analysis of economic and structural development issues in Malawi. The aim of the publication is to foster better-informed policy analysis and debate regarding the key challenges that Malawi faces in its endeavor to achieve high rates of stable, inclusive and sustainable economic growth.

The Economic Commission for Africa defines structural transformation as the fundamental changes in economic and social structures that advance inclusive and sustainable development This definition addresses three key questions: a) What is structural transformation?

Inclusive development is the seductive idea that a more dynamic and productive economy can go hand in hand with reduced inequality and exclusion. This requires crafting together different values and realities, through cooperation and negotiation between different economic and social interests.

This paper aims to identify the main drivers of poverty reduction in Malawi. Using an augmented poverty decomposition methodology, it explores in what way the different farm and non-farm economic activities contribute to poverty reduction and income growth.

African Governance Report V examines efforts to improve the governance of Africa’s abundant natural resources, with particular emphasis on strengthening natural resource governance institutions and frameworks for the enhancement of domestic revenue mobilization and engendering economic diversification and structural transformation on the contine

Adapting to climate change in human settlements is critical to ensuring that human development is not jeopardized and that the world’s growing population has the opportunity to thrive where they live.

The paper critically reviews the arguments for and against both employment guarantees and income guarantees when viewed as rights-based policy instruments for poverty reduction in a developing economy, with special reference to India.

This paper published by Center For Global Development, critically reviews the arguments for and against both employment guarantees and income guarante

Two billion workers — representing 61.2 per cent of the world’s employed population — are in informal employment. The third edition of this work provides, for the first time, comparable estimates on the size of the informal economy and a statistical profile of informality in all its diversity at the global and regional levels.

Inequality between the richest and the rest in Malawi continues to rise, with poverty remaining extreme and endemic. Climate change is compounding the challenges, with recent droughts and floods likely to have worsened poverty, resulting in one in three Malawians relying on humanitarian assistance in 2016.

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