2017-18 witnessed impressive growth of renewable energy (RE) in the electricity sector wherein two major milestones were crossed.

Electricity distribution sector is at a cross-road, with rising cost of supply, emergence of competitive renewable supply options, loss of cross-subsidising sales, and sustained high-cost base-load surplus.

In spite of the growth in short term open access (OA), the existing OA framework has not been implemented in the same spirit as envisaged in the Act and is thus is yet to realize its full potential, mainly on account of the resistance from DISCOMs.

Record lows in price discovery for wind power (Rs. 3.46/kWh) and solar PV (Rs. 2.44/kWh) coupled with the highest ever yearly capacity addition of ~11.3 GW of renewables in 2016-17 have compelled even the most ardent sceptics to sit up and take note of renewable energy.

India’s ambitious renewable energy target of 175 GW by 2022 has firmly placed renewables as a mainstream electricity supply option. This has attracted a great deal of attention from diverse stakeholders in India as well as the international community.

India’s ambitious renewable energy target of 175 GW by 2022 has firmly placed renewables as a mainstream electricity supply option. This has attracted a great deal of attention from diverse stakeholders in India as well as the international community.

The 175 GW renewable generation capacity target for 2022 has fundamental implications for electricity grid planning and operations. Renewable energy generation, especially from wind and solar power, is variable in nature, given its dependency on the weather.

Distributed solar photovoltaics (PV) is expected to witness significant growth in India owing to increasing economic viability and a facilitating policy-regulatory framework in most states.

Renewable energy-based mini-grids can be an important alternative to, or enhance the effectiveness of, central grid extension as a way to increase access to reliable electricity services. While there are a number of challenges to implementing RE mini-grids, many of these can be addressed by well-conceived policy measures.

While the Jawaharlal Nehru National Solar Mission (JNNSM) opened up the solar electricity sector in India, the focus has primarily been on large-scale grid-connected power plants. With the drastic fall in prices of solar photovoltaic (PV)

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