The central government’s flagship programme to provide free liquefied petroleum gas connections has been in operation for two years, providing more than 3.5 crore free LPG connections to poor women. This much-needed scheme is a major step to reduce indoor air pollution, drudgery faced by women, and one that promises to extend LPG access. However, little is known about the progress of the scheme. Has it led to sustained use of clean fuels among poor households?

There is mounting evidence of the severe health impacts of household air pollution from burning traditional fuels such as firewood, agricultural residue, dung, coal and kerosene for cooking. This is particularly relevant in the Indian context where more than 75% of rural households in India primarily use such fuels.

The Pradhan Mantri Ujjwala Yojana, to provide concessional LPG connections, is a step in the right direction but much more needs to be done by 2019 and beyond to ensure homes in India cook using modern fuels. This article explores the issues of providing connections, subsidy provisioning and ensuring sustained use of LPG and other modern fuels, so as to displace solid fuels from Indian kitchens. It also highlights the need for planning for increased demand and addressing institutional gaps to ensure that the benefits of modern fuel adoption, especially health benefits, are realised.

Following the Supreme Court judgement of 2014 cancelling the allocation of more than 200 captive coal blocks, the government quickly brought in legislation and began the process of their reallocation. While the new allocation framework is an improvement over the previous regime, it suffers from many potentially serious shortcomings.

Energy is a key input for the socio-economic development of a country, particularly for countries like India. Hence, it is important to holistically and objectively understand and assess the country’s energy sector, so that policies and interventions can be appropriately prioritized to further the country’s development.

India is beset with a huge coal shortage that is affecting its power production, necessitating coal imports and increasing its trade deficit. This report analyzes the causes leading to the shortage and the Government's response to it.

This report presents a broad overview of the coal sector, highlights key challenges and provides suggestions on overcoming them. It calls for an independent regulator to look after planning and execution, transparency mechanisms alongwith the compliance to environmental norms.

There is an insufficient understanding of the seriousness of India’s energy security problem and the impact this is having on the country’s development. This has led to various crises in the energy sector, which, in turn, have prompted ad hoc emergency responses that do not address the underlying fundamentals.

This article critically analyses the decision-making systems behind the proposed Pune metro rail system and its detailed project report, exposing several weaknesses in both. The decision-making system is seen to be ad hoc, and not sufficiently transparent or participative.

This paper critically analyzes the decision making systems behind the proposed Pune metro rail system and its detailed project report, and exposes many weaknesses in both. The decision making system is seen to be ad?hoc, and not sufficiently transparent or participative. The detailed project report suffers from many serious methodological and analytical errors.

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