Energy efficiency can play a crucial role in India’s goal to provide reliable and affordable access to energy in a sustainable and secure manner. A number of policies and programmes aimed at conserving energy, improving efficiency, and managing demand have been implemented in India in recent years.

Energy efficiency can play a crucial role in India’s goal to provide reliable and affordable access to energy in a sustainable and secure manner. A number of policies and programmes aimed at conserving energy, improving efficiency, and managing demand have been implemented in India in recent years.

Electricity distribution sector is at a cross-road, with rising cost of supply, emergence of competitive renewable supply options, loss of cross-subsidising sales, and sustained high-cost base-load surplus.

There is mounting evidence of the severe health impacts of household air pollution from burning traditional fuels such as firewood, agricultural residue, dung, coal and kerosene for cooking. This is particularly relevant in the Indian context where more than 75% of rural households in India primarily use such fuels.

The implementation of fuel surcharges has been strongly advocated by the Union Government as a measure to alleviate the financial predicament of DISCOMs. In this context, the report studies the various processes, methodologies, and practices across states to determine, levy, and recover fuel surcharges.

In spite of the growth in short term open access (OA), the existing OA framework has not been implemented in the same spirit as envisaged in the Act and is thus is yet to realize its full potential, mainly on account of the resistance from DISCOMs.

Record lows in price discovery for wind power (Rs. 3.46/kWh) and solar PV (Rs. 2.44/kWh) coupled with the highest ever yearly capacity addition of ~11.3 GW of renewables in 2016-17 have compelled even the most ardent sceptics to sit up and take note of renewable energy.

Of the total electricity consumption in year 2014-15 in India, residential and commercial buildings accounted for ~23% and ~8%, respectively. It is likely that there could be ten fold increase in electricity consumption in these segments in the next thirty years.

India’s ambitious renewable energy target of 175 GW by 2022 has firmly placed renewables as a mainstream electricity supply option. This has attracted a great deal of attention from diverse stakeholders in India as well as the international community.

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