An assessment of monthly data shows that in 2017, OECD net electricity production grew by 0.8% compared to 2016. There was a significant increase, 16.7%, in Geothermal, Solar, Wind and Other renewables generation and a marginal increase of Hydro by 0.5%. Combustible Fuels and Nuclear fell by 1% and 0.8%, respectively.

The cement sector is the third-largest industrial energy consumer and the second-largest industrial CO2 emitter globally.

Global energy demand rose by 2.1% in 2017, more than twice the previous year’s rate, boosted by strong global economic growth, with oil, gas and coal meeting most of the increase in demand for energy, and renewables seeing impressive gains.

Global energy demand rose by 2.1% in 2017, more than twice the previous year’s rate, boosted by strong global economic growth, with oil, gas and coal meeting most of the increase in demand for energy, and renewables seeing impressive gains.

The Nordic region is at the forefront of the global growth of electric mobility. The Nordic Electric Vehicle Outlook 2018 (NEVO 2018) aims to identify and discuss recent developments of electric mobility in the five Nordic countries: Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden.

Chile has emerged as a world-class destination for solar and wind energy developers, according to the International Energy Agency’s latest review of the country’s energy policies.

Australia has abundant energy resources. It is a leading exporter of coal, uranium and liquefied natural gas (LNG), much of which is destined for Asia’s growing markets.At home, Australia’s energy sector is undergoing a significant transformation.

Heat accounts for over half of global energy consumption and is a significant contributor to CO2 emissions. Renewables play a key role in decarbonising and providing cleaner heat but currently account for less than 10% of heat supply.

China’s district heat network is the world’s largest. In 2015, it consumed more energy than the entire United Kingdom.

The global buildings sector is growing at unprecedented rates, and it will continue to do so. Over the next 40 years, the world is expected to build 230 billion square metres in new construction – adding the equivalent of Paris to the planet every single week. This rapid growth is not without consequences.

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