India, the world’s fourth-largest greenhouse gas emitter, has pledged to reduce its emissions intensity per unit gross domestic product (GDP) by 33 to 35 percent below 2005 levels by 2030 through its Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC).

The International Maritime Organization’s initial strategy on reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from ships stipulates that the international shipping sector should assess the impacts on states prior to adoption of the mitigation measures included in the strategy.

India is committed to contributing to the global low carbon growth agenda. By 2030, India intends to reduce the emissions intensity of its GDP by 33% to 35% from 2005 levels by focusing on diversifying and growing its energy portfolio to reduce its carbon emissions and support the sustainable growth of the economy.

India is committed to contributing to the global low carbon growth agenda. By 2030, India intends to reduce the emissions intensity of its GDP by 33% to 35% from 2005 levels by focusing on diversifying and growing its energy portfolio to reduce its carbon emissions and support the sustainable growth of the economy.

In 2017, the warmest year on record of years without the occurrence of El Niño, and a year with normal global economic growth, the increase in global greenhouse gas emissions resumed at a rate of 1.3% per year, reaching 50.9 gigatonnes in CO2 equivalent.

A report released by the World Health Organisation (WHO) reveals a swift upward trajectory of global health spending, particularly in low- and middle-income countries where health spending is growing on an annual average of 6% compared to 4% in high-income countries.

Soil and nutrients loss are among the major impediments to a stable and sustained agricultural development in Malawi.

India, through the Paris Climate Agreement in 2015, made a commitment to reduce its emissions intensity of GDP (kg CO2/INR) by 33–35% in 2030, over the 2005 levels (GoI, 2015).

This document provides a crucial framework to enable water managers and policy makers to assess the impact of climate uncertainty and change on their water resources and work towards effective adaptation strategies.

The 2018 Climatescope Report, titled Emerging Markets Outlook 2018: Energy transition in the world’s fastest growing economies, reports that the world’s developing countries are driving the global clean power transition, fuelled by sinking technology costs and surging electricity demand.

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