South Asia remained the fastest growing region in the world last year, but growth remained driven by domestic demand – and not exports – which resulted in another year of double-digit volume growth of imports. The value of imports was further pushed up by rising oil prices.

The Southern Africa economy is projected to grow slower than others in the continent—at 2.2 percent in 2019 and 2.8 percent in 2020. At the heart of this slow growth are the major headwinds of high inflation, increasing government debts, and tepid growth in South Africa, which contributes about two-thirds of the region’s GDP.

In 2018, real GDP in East Africa grew by an estimated 5.7 percent, slightly less than the 5.9 percent in 2017 and the highest among African regions. Economic growth is projected to remain strong, at 5.9 percent in 2019 and 6.1 percent in 2020. The countries with the highest economic growth are Ethiopia, Rwanda, Tanzania, Kenya, and Djibouti.

The relatively stable economic performance of Asia and the Pacific conceals increasing downside risks to regional progress in implementing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

In 2018, the GDP growth rate in Central Africa accelerated slightly, to 2.2 percent from 1.1 percent in 2017, but remained below the African average of 3.5 percent. Central Africa’s growth was driven primarily by the rebound in raw material prices, principally oil.

Overall economic growth in West Africa is projected to be at 3.6 percent in 2019 and 2020, boosted by the recovery of commodity prices and improved production and service sectors in the region, although challenges and uneven performance would remain, the African Development Bank’s regional economic indicator report revealed.

Nigeria's emergence from recession remains slow: real GDP grew by 1.9 percent in 2018. While this was above the 0.8 percent growth of 2017, it was below the population growth rate, government projections and

Growth in developing Asia is projected to soften to 5.7% in 2019 and 5.6% in 2020. Excluding Asia’s high-income newly industrialized economies, growth is expected to slip from 6.4% in 2018 to 6.2% in 2019 and 6.1% in 2020.

India submitted its Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) to UNFCCC in Oct. 2015 as a part of its obligation to the global community in combating the Climate Change. Countries are due to update their current pledges to the Paris Agreement by the end of next year (2020).

With every tree felled and every piece of coal burned for energy, Indonesia is inching closer to its ecological tipping point. And once it passes that point, the country’s economy will greatly suffer, leading to an increase in poverty, a higher mortality rate and lower human development.

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