This paper is based on a field study carried out in 2015 in two coastal ecotourism areas in The Gambia — Kartong and Tanji. The study investigated sustainability communication by tourism service providers in the context of climate change and ecovillage design education (EDE).

This nexus brief focuses on the phenomenon of the El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and in particular on the 2015/2016 El Niño event, which faded out in May 2016 but has impacts and effects on environmental and societal systems that will extend well into 2017.

Around three quarters of Nepal’s population is dependent on agriculture, which is highly climate sensitive and increasingly at risk from climate change impacts. This directly affects the economic growth and development of the country.

During 2015–2016, record temperatures triggered a pan-tropical episode of coral bleaching, the third global-scale event since mass bleaching was first documented in the 1980s. Here we examine how and why the severity of recurrent major bleaching events has varied at multiple scales, using aerial and underwater surveys of Australian reefs combined with satellite-derived sea surface temperatures. The distinctive geographic footprints of recurrent bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef in 1998, 2002 and 2016 were determined by the spatial pattern of sea temperatures in each year.

Climate change is expected to modify ecological responses in the ocean, with the potential for important effects on the ecosystem services provided to humankind. Here we address the question of how rapidly multiple drivers of marine ecosystem change develop in the future ocean. By analysing an ensemble of models we find that, within the next 15 years, the climate change-driven trends in multiple ecosystem drivers emerge from the background of natural variability in 55% of the ocean and propagate rapidly to encompass 86% of the ocean by 2050 under a ‘business-as-usual’ scenario.

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